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Old 10-21-2006   #21
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Default Re: Studio Portrait Lighting-A How To

Quote:
Originally Posted by Benji
This is correct in a textbook situation with a 16 inch silver parabolic lighting modifier wiith barn doors, but according to master photographer Don Blair when using a softbox or an umbrella you will get "wrap around" lighting which tends to add some fill to the shadow side. That is why I put "approximately" in my posting.

Benji
Just so I understand what you are saying... meter readings for soft boxes are different then meter readings for relfectors. I always thought that 2 stops was 2 stops, no matter what the light source.

Anyway I have always thought that ratios were a waste of time and energy to learn...that as photographers we should think in stop.

Good tutorial BTW.

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Old 11-17-2006   #22
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Default Re: Studio Portrait Lighting-A How To

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Originally Posted by Leohr
In the paragraph about the main light, I suspect there was a typo? In the last line, "The closer the light source is to the subject the softer the light appears." Didn't you mean the further the light source, the softer the light appears?
Leohr,

No typo, he was correct.* The softness quality of light is a relative ratio between the size of the source compared with the distance of the source.* For example we know that a softbox creates "softer" light than a flash with no modifier.* This is true if both are at the same distance.* Well if you were to compare the softness or hardness of a bare bulb (using random numbers for example) at 3' from the subject with a softbox lets say 30' from the subject, you might find the both similiar.* This is because the softbox at such a long distance has turned into a "small" light source as is also the bare bulb at 3'.* I hope I explained this correctly.* If you're confused please visit the video in the link I'm providing, as this is where I learned of this "phenomenon" (for lack of better words!).

You'd be amazed at how much at how much you can learn from this <a href="http://www.sportsshooter.com/special.../index.html">8 video series</a>.* TONS of imformation packed in there!

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Old 11-18-2006   #23
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Default Re: Studio Portrait Lighting-A How To

Great tutorial Benji, Thanks!
Just what I needed and all I need now is ............................. more lights! Damn!!!!
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Old 11-19-2006   #24
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Default Re: Studio Portrait Lighting-A How To

Hey jgoeden, that was great info. I just watched all of the videos, and that had reallly good info, thanks for posting it. you should put that in the lighting forum, so everyone can see it. I don't know how to hyperlink.
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Old 11-26-2006   #25
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Default Re: Studio Portrait Lighting-A How To

I just wanted to say thank you for these tutorials, you have made it real simple to understand for people like me who know dibbly squat about studio photography.

thank you again.
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Old 03-29-2007   #26
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Default Re: Studio Portrait Lighting-A How To

I really needed this - thank you so much!
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Old 03-29-2007   #27
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Default Re: Studio Portrait Lighting-A How To

Quote:
Originally Posted by grsphoto View Post
2 stops is a 4:1 ratio 1 1/2 stops is a 3:1 ratio
Understanding Lighting Ratios
Actually a difference in brightness of one stop between the main light and fill light (read with an incidence meter at the subject) will yield a 3:1 ratio.

If the fill light is positioned on the lens axis, above or below the lens it will place X amount of light on both the highlight AND shadow side of the face.

If the main light is one stop brighter than the fill light, then it places 2X amount of light on the highlight side of the face.

So the ratio is 2x (main light) plus 1X (fill light) which equals 3X amount of light on the highlight side of the face with 1 X (fill light) on the shadow side of the face.

The ratio is 2X+1X:1X which is a 3:1 ratio.
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Old 05-04-2007   #28
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Default Re: Studio Portrait Lighting-A How To

Hi Benji,

I've been exploring your tutorials again and really think they're great. I do have 2 questions about the lighting setup.

1. Is the fill light in the wide angle shot to camera left due to the fact that you moved back to take the shot or are you positioning the main and fill to camera left?

2. I'm working on posing female models. Do you always position the body so it is turned away from the main light and the shoulder and profile are lit from the main light as opposed to having the subject's body facing the main light and lit head on?
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Old 05-07-2007   #29
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Default Re: Studio Portrait Lighting-A How To

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Originally Posted by tmrdesign View Post
Hi Benji,

I've been exploring your tutorials again and really think they're great. I do have 2 questions about the lighting setup.

1. Is the fill light in the wide angle shot to camera left due to the fact that you moved back to take the shot or are you positioning the main and fill to camera left?

2. I'm working on posing female models. Do you always position the body so it is turned away from the main light and the shoulder and profile are lit from the main light as opposed to having the subject's body facing the main light and lit head on?
TMR,

Thanks for the kind words.

1. The fill light should be behind the photographer (I moved it slightly forward and stepped behind it for the wide angle shot for illustration purposes) and it should also be on the same side as the main light is.

2. I pose nearly all of my females in the manner you described above as this will assist in getting the 1-3-2 posing technique quickly and easily.

Benji
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Old 05-07-2007   #30
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Default Re: Studio Portrait Lighting-A How To

Hi Benji,

This is the first time I've ever heard someone saying to put the fill on the same side as the main light. I've been putting it as close to the axis of the lens as possible and most often slightly above and to the opposite side of the main if I don't have enough room to have it directly behind me.

Can you explain more about the concept of having the fill on the same side as the main? You are suggesting it should not be on the lens' axis. Is that correct?


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