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harryd 04-04-2008 09:15 AM

Inherited some old toys, need help
 
I inherited my Great Grandfathers camera equipment and have no clue on what I have or if I need to add insurance on my homeowners ins. Anyone know what this is worth and no it is not for sale? Also is this equipment still usable? Anything else you can tell me about it? I have never used or seen med or large format cameras used so I am totally lost. Any help appreciated.

http://www.pbase.com/harrydavid/image/95135558.jpg

I am guessing this is a Graflex Speed from the book that is with it?

http://www.pbase.com/harrydavid/image/95135574.jpg

The camera case for the Graflex

http://www.pbase.com/harrydavid/image/95135571.jpg

nohoneythatsnotanewlens 04-04-2008 09:47 AM

Re: Inherited some old toys, need help
 
You have a nice keepsake. Unfortunately, like old pianos, old cameras grow old very gracefully but aren't worth much. I have the same Yashika. I bought it slightly used many years ago for $125.00. It still works but now adorns the bookcase in my study.

I recently bought a like new Brownie movie camera, in the original box with all paperwork, hoping it had some value. I got home and searched on e-bay only to find 10 of them on there with a high bid of $3.25.

Enjoy the memories.

Rick

harryd 04-04-2008 09:52 AM

Re: Inherited some old toys, need help
 
Thanks, and that is totally fine with me, I plan to put them on display in my home as soon as I can figure out how to open the Graflex and mount the lens and back to it :crazy2:. There is a member of my camera club who may know how and I plan to let him help me.

Thunder9 04-04-2008 12:53 PM

Re: Inherited some old toys, need help
 
I can only add that at on time (may still be so) there was a great market for the flash tubes on the graflex as they make great handles for light sabres, Imitation osf course. :)

michaelhcothran 04-04-2008 01:10 PM

Re: Inherited some old toys, need help
 
The Yashica D is still very usable, and will stun you with the fine image quality it can produce. It takes 120 film, still readily available, and will yield 12 shots per roll. The negatives are square, 56mm x 56mm, or approximately 2.25" x 2.25". However, because of their larger size, you can crop them to a rectangle if you choose, for printing. You will need a hand meter, or you can use the meter from another camera. It doesn't really have much monetary value though. Perhaps a hundred dollars or so at best. The later version, a Yashica Mat 124, can bring about twice that amount. Yashica (now Kyocera) has always produced quality cameras at reasonable prices, in my opinion.
Michael H. Cothran
Nashville, Tennessee

harryd 04-04-2008 01:18 PM

Re: Inherited some old toys, need help
 
Thanks Michael, at one time there was a B&W darkroom in the house and I made some prints from old neg. from both cameras but just got the camera's last week. I think I will have my friend show me how to use them and at the least take a few shots just to say I did. I have not shot a frame of film in 10 years and then only 35 mm.

Latinbob 04-04-2008 04:58 PM

Re: Inherited some old toys, need help
 
There is probably a hidden button on the top front of the Graflex. Feel around besides the viewfinder. You should be able to press down on the button and the front will open up. It's hard to tell from the picture, but it could either be a 4x5 camera, or a smaller 2 1/4 x 3 1/4 folder. Either one looks great on display. It probably still works too, as long as the bellow is good and the shutter works.

That looks like a Polaroid back next to the Graflex.

The Yashica is pretty sweet, and you should run a roll of 120 through it to see what you get.

They may not have a high monetary value, but they have a high historical value, and a definite sentimental value!

Bob

Edit: That's a sweet Polaroid back for the Graflex. I looked at your Pbase site. That is most likely a 4x5.

Here's instructions for opening the front:
"It is difficult to figure out how to open a Speed Graphic when it is closed. There is a button mounted under the leather on the right side near the top. It is visible as a bump. Depress this bump and pull the focus bed (i.e., the front, when the camera is closed) down until the bed braces lock into position."

from: Pacemaker Speed Graphic

harryd 04-05-2008 10:34 AM

Re: Inherited some old toys, need help
 
Latin Bob thanks it is a 4x5 and I will look for the hidden button. I can tell I am going to shoot with them one time if they work just to say I used the same camera my Great Grandfather did, he died when I was 5 and I am 50 now so it has high sentimental value to me. I am actually thinking I have a print from one of his old negatives of a local tourist landscape, I may try to re-shoot it from the same general area and hang it by the other one along with a digital one just as a conversation piece.

Not4wood 04-05-2008 09:48 PM

Re: Inherited some old toys, need help
 
Harry,

Both of these were and are still great Cameras. The Images were always impressive and you will really get a kick out of using them. Just keep in mind that at this time they used everthing as Manual and kept a Light Meter around there necks at all times.

Try a couple of Portraits using these Cameras and see how it affects your Minds Eye!
Same Lighting Techniques, same exposures but everything that was used then is just on the Manual Side of things Technical.

cyclohexane 04-05-2008 11:00 PM

Re: Inherited some old toys, need help
 
The Yashica D's still a great user camera; I've seen them being used around here.

The "Yashikor" on the lens indicates it is an earlier model of the D, as the later models have better quality "Yashinon" lenses (and a f/2.8 viewing lens)... at least, according to Wikipedia and some other internet sources. =)

harryd 04-06-2008 08:29 PM

Re: Inherited some old toys, need help
 
Thanks guys, I may have a problem with the Graflex I found the button to open it up but it still does not want to open. It acts like the button is not going all the way down. Time to find a local person that knows more about it. Thanks again for all the info, I really appreciate it.

cyclohexane 05-02-2008 12:57 PM

Re: Inherited some old toys, need help
 
Ever get that Graflex open?

digitalzed 05-02-2008 02:25 PM

Re: Inherited some old toys, need help
 
Man, even the case is sweet. Don't get that anymore when you buy any camera!

C Webb 05-03-2008 01:11 AM

Re: Inherited some old toys, need help
 
The Graphlex is still an excellent piece of equipment and is becoming more and more popular with the "Large Format Boom"
that is going on today. 4x5 film is available from several sources and is easy to home process. Three years ago a pretty rough camera could be purchased for $50.00 or less. Todays ebay shows them going for $100 to a thousand dollars today. If it truly is a "Speed" it would make it more desirable since you could mount and use lesser expensive "Barrel" lens's. The focal plane shutter in the speed graphic becomes the shutter.

Don't give either of the cameras away as they do have a monitary
value. If there is a lens and shutter mounted on the graphic is even better. They no longer are manufacturing film holders so until some begins to make em the old ones are valuable.

Have fun,
C Webb

harryd 05-03-2008 10:12 AM

Re: Inherited some old toys, need help
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by cyclohexane (Post 422852)
Ever get that Graflex open?

Yes, thanks. I will try to take some shots of it this weekend.

harryd 05-03-2008 10:13 AM

Re: Inherited some old toys, need help
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by c_dwebb@msn.com (Post 423427)
The Graphlex is still an excellent piece of equipment and is becoming more and more popular with the "Large Format Boom"
that is going on today. 4x5 film is available from several sources and is easy to home process. Three years ago a pretty rough camera could be purchased for $50.00 or less. Todays ebay shows them going for $100 to a thousand dollars today. If it truly is a "Speed" it would make it more desirable since you could mount and use lesser expensive "Barrel" lens's. The focal plane shutter in the speed graphic becomes the shutter.

Don't give either of the cameras away as they do have a monitary
value. If there is a lens and shutter mounted on the graphic is even better. They no longer are manufacturing film holders so until some begins to make em the old ones are valuable.

Have fun,
C Webb

Because it was my great grandfathers it is priceless to me :). I will take some shots of it open and you guys can let me know more about it. Thanks for all your help.

cyclohexane 05-03-2008 11:34 AM

Re: Inherited some old toys, need help
 
You should shoot with it. The first time I printed a 4x5 negative in the darkroom, I was blown away. 120 had a similar effect, but it wasn't as spectacular because I had already printed 4x5. Still, I made a print from 135 for kicks yesterday afternoon, and man that stuff sucks...

...at least, in comparison.

heartseye 05-03-2008 05:02 PM

Re: Inherited some old toys, need help
 
Yashica started their TLR line with the Yashica A.....robust but really soft glass. The D was somewhat better but still soft even by the standards of the day. The Yashica-Mat line was the best they made, and it really was surpisingly good....

eric rose 05-04-2008 10:09 PM

Re: Inherited some old toys, need help
 
check out Graflex.Org: Speed Graphics, Large Format Photography, and More

harryd 05-05-2008 08:00 AM

Re: Inherited some old toys, need help
 
Thanks for all the info guys, I hope to get to shoot a few of the camera open tonight.

harryd 05-05-2008 09:11 PM

Re: Inherited some old toys, need help
 
Ok, here is the Graflex open, it looks like the bellows is in good shape. Can anyone tell me how to know what the two lens are for...Doh:crazy2: I mean wide angle vs telephoto? As you can tell I have no clue about any of this.

http://www.pbase.com/harrydavid/image/96653388.jpg

http://www.pbase.com/harrydavid/image/96653392.jpg

http://www.pbase.com/harrydavid/image/96653388.j%5Bg

heartseye 05-05-2008 09:52 PM

Re: Inherited some old toys, need help
 
I can't quite make out the numbers in the photos....but, on a 4x5 camera the 150mm focal length is usually considered "normal". Longer than that is telephoto, shorter is wide angle.....:)...Bob

harryd 05-06-2008 07:14 AM

Re: Inherited some old toys, need help
 
Thanks Bob, I did find on the link Eric Rose posted that the big lens is 150mm approx. I will check and see what the other two are.

robn70 04-28-2009 01:40 PM

Re: Inherited some old toys, need help
 
Very Cool...Thanks for sharing them..

C Webb 05-01-2009 12:17 AM

Re: Inherited some old toys, need help
 
Those of us who used the 4x5 during it's glory years preferred the 135mm as the normal lens. 150 could indeed be used as a normal but was a tad long for press work. Most of us also packed a 203 to 210 mm for head shots etc.
We all pretty much used the solenoid shutter release for tripping the shutter. I still have a box full of them. The Crown Graphic with the Kalart range finder
was a much lighter camera than the "speed". We had adapters to work with
the flash gun so we could use any thing from a press 22 down to no.5 or 25. The only difference between a 5 and a 25, was simply the manufacturer. (GE, or Sylvania)

Take care,
C Webb

walter23 05-04-2009 02:21 AM

Re: Inherited some old toys, need help
 
They may not be valuable, in the sense of old collectible pretentious antiques, but they're valuable in terms of utility, aesthetics, and as family keepsakes. You can still shoot them, you know. The speed graphic is a great camera; I love using mine. I think yours might be a crown graphic though; similar.

The telephoto lens is, well, a telephoto lens. It's a long lens for 4x5.

Quote:

Originally Posted by nohoneythatsnotanewlens (Post 398815)
You have a nice keepsake. Unfortunately, like old pianos, old cameras grow old very gracefully but aren't worth much. I have the same Yashika. I bought it slightly used many years ago for $125.00. It still works but now adorns the bookcase in my study.

I recently bought a like new Brownie movie camera, in the original box with all paperwork, hoping it had some value. I got home and searched on e-bay only to find 10 of them on there with a high bid of $3.25.

Enjoy the memories.

Rick


walter23 05-04-2009 02:25 AM

Re: Inherited some old toys, need help
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by harryd (Post 399015)
Thanks Michael, at one time there was a B&W darkroom in the house and I made some prints from old neg. from both cameras but just got the camera's last week. I think I will have my friend show me how to use them and at the least take a few shots just to say I did. I have not shot a frame of film in 10 years and then only 35 mm.

You can shoot colour film and slide film with the yashica D as well. Any 120 film will work. If you live in a reasonably sized city you probably have a professional lab that'll process 120; just ask around.

You can look at slides (e.g. velvia, ektachrome, etc) directly, or if you get negatives the lab can do prints for you or scans.

TLRs are a lot of fun to shoot.

And you really ought to use that graflex. Get some cheap 4x5 film and tray process it in the dark. Lots of hints at largeformatphotography.info (and the forum there, which should be linked on the main page).

Mike1234 06-21-2009 11:14 AM

Re: Inherited some old toys, need help
 
Not too long ago a 4x5 Crown Graphic in really nice cosmetic condition in good working order was worth about $300 (body only). The lenses, lens boards, etc., vary greatly in price with the better performers and rarer models fetching good money... some very good money. Do your research before you sell anything.

Ed Shapiro 07-05-2009 08:55 PM

Re: Inherited some old toys, need help
 
3 Attachment(s)
The Yashica is one of the earliest TLRs made by Kayasara in Japan in the mid 1950s after the occupation was over. In those days most of the Japanese cameras were kinda copies of better European and American cameras except for the innards which worked in a manner of speaking but were far inferior in construction. The camera shown, the model A and the Yashica-MAT all resembled the famous German Rolleiflex and Rolleicord cameras of that era. The Rollei equipment started to be imported again (soon after the war) by Karl Heitz of New York. When the Yashica cameras started to show up in New York there was talk about suing Yashika for patent infringement and “passing off” but the look is as far as it went- beauty was only skin deep! Once the technicians opened the Yashica there was no argument of infringement. The mechanisms were built like mouse traps but they worked nonetheless and the BIG negative was very desirable to 35mm users. The larger format made up for some of the optical shortcomings and besides the camera shown went for a mere $49.94- the Rolleis were 10 times more on the average. I used the Yashika MAT-LM ($74.95) in high school and it worked well.

The SPEEDGRAPHIC (well-actually a CROWN GRAPHIC) is indeed a classic. The model shown has the outboard Kalart rangefinder, the improved Graphex shutter, over the Rapex which was known to fall apart at high shutter speeds. Iy has the classic f4.7 Optar lens made by Wollensac. Notice the rugged bi-post synch terminal- much hardier that the PC types of the European shutters. The Graph-Lite flash holder is also a classic with its’ famous quick release encircling clamps and flat shoe mounted over the rangefinder. The flash holder was for expendable flash-lamps, the reflector shown is for Press5 pr Press-25 lamps- the was another reflector for the more powerful pres11s, 22s, 40, and 50,s. The flash holder also powered the solenoid mounted on the lens board enabling tripping the shutter from a micro switch on the flash holder. The other outlets were for extension flash holders. The Optar (normal) 135mm lens is cam-coupled to the rangefinder- the cam is located on the drop bed. I can’t ID the long lens- there were many portrait lenses fitted to those cameras but were not always cam coupled to the rangefinder- ground glass focusing was required.

The Polaroid back show is totally obsolete in that the film has not been produce in many decades. A Fugi adapter can be inserted in the Graf-Loc back and Fugi instant film is still manufactured. The optical viewfinder has an insert mask to accommodate the 3x4 Polaroid back shown behind the camera. For full 4x5 film the insert is removed. The camera also features the classic wire sports finder.

This camera (starting with the actual SPEED model) was the “Badge” of the professional press, sports, and wedding photographer from the late 1930s through the mid 1960s when smaller formats started to gain popularity. The view camera movements were somewhat limited and the normal lens did not have a large enough circle of coverage to accommodate even those limited movements- the 167mm or longer versions were better suited for that kind of usage. I don’t see the controls for the rear focal-plane shutter which went up to 1.000sec- thus the name SPEED-graphic! Many photographer had the rear shutters removed for safety purposes and preferred the full sych between-the-lens models. If this camera never had theses controls it may be an early CROWN model which was made sans the FP shutter. ON CLOSER EXIMINATION IR SAW THE DESIGNATION "CROWN" ON THE LENS BOARD. The later crwns had a Bakolite body rather than the leeather cover wood, featured a Schneider Xenar standard lens and was called the Crown Special, however the term "Speed Graphic" hung on untill the company stoped manufacturing all of their 4x5s sometime in the 1970s.

The camera, as it is, can make a handy little field camera for those who like big negatives from a hand held camera with a rangefinder. The lenses of pretty decent at around f/8 and f/11.

Ed:afro:




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