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Old 10-16-2011   #21
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Default Re: Something new to learn

my third roll gave me a little trouble spooling and may have infact allowed for it to touch in a couple of places leading to some odd artifacts on a couple of the negatives.

Here is a link to one of the shots from that roll posted in the B&W forum

Something Shiny
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Old 10-17-2011   #22
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You have a classic MF 6x4.5 camera and a long time industry workhorse. Among other aspects of photography it was a favorite of many wedding and portrait photographers. There is a soft-focus lens for that body to die for! It is one of the best SF lenses I have ever used and mimics the inimitable effects of the class Imagon lenses of the Hollywood days.

I can't be sure but it is rumored that Kodak is headed for the bankruptcy court. If you can get you hands on some Tri-X Professional or Plus-X or some T-Max in the 120 format it is advisable to get hold of it a freeze it just in case of the worst case outcome.

On color neg or transparency film, you migh want to do the same with Kodak Portra NC 120 films but if that disappears the Figi materials are just fine, and in fact, I like their transparency films better than Kodaks slide films..

Back in the darkroom (where I used to spend 40% of my life) let me suggest a few things:

Who ever said black and white film processing is "fun" must be a masochist! I used to process about 100 rolls each week and those reels can be a hellish nightmare. The only metal ones that were really well designed to not mess up were are the Nikor brand ones. If you drop any of them, regardless of the brand, you might just as well toss it in the nearest garbage can. When they become deformed or misaligned, well- you don't to know want you don't wanna use them.

If you can get some outdated film, it is good to practice loading in the dark or with your eyes closed- DON"T CHEAT- or powers that be will get you back in the darkroom with critical film.

As far as film developers are concerned, unless you do lots of film, you best bet is a one-shot developer in liquid form whic you dilute from a concentrated stock solution. Kodak HC-110 is a god example of this kind of developer. In powdered form, D-76 is a good choice. If you find some of theses; stock up.

Ilford still have some paperers and print developers. Another option is to process you negatives and then scan them into you digital processing system.

For good quality make sure your development time is strictly according to the manufacturers recommendations as well as adgitation intervals and methods. Keep all you film baths at the same temperature or serious quality losses can result or reticulation can occur, that is when the emulsion shits and creates mega- grain. Avoid heat drying, use a wetting agent and hang you film in a clean dry place. A cold light or a Chromega color is good for black and white prints- you get smooth gradations and dust almost dust free enlargements if you use a soft brush, an anti -static cloth or some gentle caned air on your negatives before you place your glassless negative carrier in the enlarger.

Good luck with your great camera- it will give you pleasing results.

Ed
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Old 10-17-2011   #23
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Many thanks for the insights and tips Ed, they are very much appreciated.
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Old 02-28-2012   #24
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Mamiya 645 is a great camera, and their lenses are superb. Have fun with this.
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Old 02-29-2012   #25
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Compared to wading through the bazillion bleeping menus found on a typical digicam, MF is a cinch!
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Old 03-03-2012   #26
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ed Shapiro View Post
I can't be sure but it is rumored that Kodak is headed for the bankruptcy court. If you can get you hands on some Tri-X Professional or Plus-X or some T-Max in the 120 format it is advisable to get hold of it a freeze it just in case of the worst case outcome.
Back in the darkroom (where I used to spend 40% of my life) let me suggest a few things:
They are just asking for protection from their creditors while they get things under control again. Kodak's problem was bad management. As I understand it, their film division is actually about the only one making a profit. They seem to want to spin it off as a separate company so if the rest goes down the drain they will still have it.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ed Shapiro View Post
Who ever said black and white film processing is "fun" must be a masochist! I used to process about 100 rolls each week and those reels can be a hellish nightmare. The only metal ones that were really well designed to not mess up were are the Nikor brand ones. If you drop any of them, regardless of the brand, you might just as well toss it in the nearest garbage can. When they become deformed or misaligned, well- you don't to know want you don't wanna use them.
Processing sheet film in trays is actually kind of fun. Processing large batches of film by time and temperature is boring as heck. I do my film processing via stand development so I can go off and do something else while it is setting there for an hour. Making fine B&W prints is a interesting hobby however.
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Old 03-03-2012   #27
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Once things hit the rumor mill- they go out of control- especially in the photo business and the photo press. The business journals say that Kodak is still functioning under receivership or under bankrupts protection but they are still working as it were. It seems that their film manufacturing will continue because in spite of the digital invasion film work is not totally dead especially in the motion picture industry. If film is manufactured the chemical developers will need to remain on the market as well. They are not gonna just dump everything else. There are other industries which they produce chemicals, plastics and fibers for and other areas of photo-digital technologies that the may involve themselves. Right now their job 1 is to revamp, redirect and change their business model so as to emerge from receivership with a new and viable business plan and satisfy the obligations of the bankruptcy laws. Any astute business person can see that the had an outdated, behind the times and almost arrogant business style and it is a wonder that the lasted this long.

Nevertheless thee did great things for the industry for decades and I, for one, would like to see them flourish and reemerge as a giant of industry. One must consider the ramifications of unemployment, the welfare of the City of Rochester and all the creditors involved in this if the giant will actually fall to it's death. We are looking at a domino effect financial unmitigated disaster that will place a black mark on the entire photographic industry and hurt people.

As far as film processing being fun- well that's no place for having fun even in the best of circumstances. People usually don't "have fun" in an operating room. If you mess up in there you can kill patients. If you mess up in the darkroom, nobody will die but you will kill days or weeks of work that will have to be re-shot. The only victim of murder will be you when your boss or your customers kill you. Well the may not resort to murder but the can fore your ass or blacken your reputation respectively.

If you are going to process black and white negatives it has to be done with precision, exact timing, totally consistent agitation and good film handling equipment and skill sets. Large volumes can be handled in dip-and-dunk heavy duty processing machines. I did medium volume so i I did my film on spools and multiple negative hangers in 3-1/2 gallon lines with nitrogen burst agitation. I built all my sinks out of plywood, fiberglass and epoxy resins. Theses sinks acted as water jackets so temperature control was easy. I still have one sink and take arraingement going but I don't use it all the time. I can mix chemicals and fire it up in a few hours. A clean drying area is also important, I have a home made version with has filtered air and very gentle heat.

Ed
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Old 07-12-2012   #28
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Default Re: Something new to learn

Ed. said it all, But I will say this If you have craigslist in your area , check it out you just might find an Enlarge for next to nothing


Quote:
Originally Posted by Ed Shapiro View Post
You have a classic MF 6x4.5 camera and a long time industry workhorse. Among other aspects of photography it was a favorite of many wedding and portrait photographers. There is a soft-focus lens for that body to die for! It is one of the best SF lenses I have ever used and mimics the inimitable effects of the class Imagon lenses of the Hollywood days.

I can't be sure but it is rumored that Kodak is headed for the bankruptcy court. If you can get you hands on some Tri-X Professional or Plus-X or some T-Max in the 120 format it is advisable to get hold of it a freeze it just in case of the worst case outcome.

On color neg or transparency film, you migh want to do the same with Kodak Portra NC 120 films but if that disappears the Figi materials are just fine, and in fact, I like their transparency films better than Kodaks slide films..

Back in the darkroom (where I used to spend 40% of my life) let me suggest a few things:

Who ever said black and white film processing is "fun" must be a masochist! I used to process about 100 rolls each week and those reels can be a hellish nightmare. The only metal ones that were really well designed to not mess up were are the Nikor brand ones. If you drop any of them, regardless of the brand, you might just as well toss it in the nearest garbage can. When they become deformed or misaligned, well- you don't to know want you don't wanna use them.

If you can get some outdated film, it is good to practice loading in the dark or with your eyes closed- DON"T CHEAT- or powers that be will get you back in the darkroom with critical film.

As far as film developers are concerned, unless you do lots of film, you best bet is a one-shot developer in liquid form whic you dilute from a concentrated stock solution. Kodak HC-110 is a god example of this kind of developer. In powdered form, D-76 is a good choice. If you find some of theses; stock up.

Ilford still have some paperers and print developers. Another option is to process you negatives and then scan them into you digital processing system.

For good quality make sure your development time is strictly according to the manufacturers recommendations as well as adgitation intervals and methods. Keep all you film baths at the same temperature or serious quality losses can result or reticulation can occur, that is when the emulsion shits and creates mega- grain. Avoid heat drying, use a wetting agent and hang you film in a clean dry place. A cold light or a Chromega color is good for black and white prints- you get smooth gradations and dust almost dust free enlargements if you use a soft brush, an anti -static cloth or some gentle caned air on your negatives before you place your glassless negative carrier in the enlarger.

Good luck with your great camera- it will give you pleasing results.

Ed
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Old 07-20-2012   #29
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Default Re: Something new to learn

Actually, just bought an Omega D2 a few weeks ago when I bought my 4x5 view camera.
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Old 07-20-2012   #30
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Hi Ed! Does the enlarger have a condenser head or a cold light head. The condenser heads are a bit sharper and yields more contrast but show every tiny dust spot or minor defect on the negative- glass carriers are almost impossible to use with out extensive had spotting of the prints. The cols light units yield great gradations and hide most dust spots. If you can find an old cold light head you can use it interchangeably on your D-2. There is also an alignment tool tat was made by Omega for that model.

Used to be a company that still stocked parts for those enlargers- I will try to fine it in my files- Up until recently, I was running 3 D-5s- two with color heads and one with a condenser and cold light head.

Ed S


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