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Old 03-07-2009   #1
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Question White Background White

Okay, Any suggestions on what type of lens to use in a studio? My studio is approximate 12x20. I have a photo listed of what I'm getting right now. My guess is that I need a certain lens with a fixed aperture? maybe...does anyone use fixed focal lens? I like to shoot on Manual but finding a hard time finding the right setting..right now I'm having to use a stock lens which is only got a aperture of 3.5-5.6....so....any lens help would be greatly appreciated.

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Old 03-11-2009   #2
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you can use any lens for in studio (just about). Whats the end result you are looking for?

When I shoot in my studio at home (which is about the size you mention) I shoot around F/8-F/9. I have 2.8 Zooms and primes too (1.8/2.0/1.4) but in studio those are also at F/8.

my apologies, I re-read the title...
If you are asking what lens to make a "white background white", its not the lens. If you have a white background (back drop) and want to keep it white you need to add light to the background (in studio). you may have to flag the BG light to prevent it from spilling on your subject?
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Old 03-11-2009   #3
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thanks brian,
yeah it was my settings i was referring to. im using a prime 1.8 but can't get the white backdrop to stay white..my guess was that i need more lights so that is what im working on...thanks for your help though
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Old 03-11-2009   #4
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Default Re: White Background White

Quote:
Originally Posted by <3Christy<3 View Post
thanks brian,
yeah it was my settings i was referring to. im using a prime 1.8 but can't get the white backdrop to stay white..my guess was that i need more lights so that is what im working on...thanks for your help though
christy

Yup, if it is coming out gray, then you are not getting light to the background. Or you maybe underexposing it a little.

Here it is grey: this is an Artic white Paper background:



added another light for the background to make it white:

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Old 03-12-2009   #5
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Default Re: White Background White

Pretty ladies!
To get the background whiter you will need to blast it with more light. You second picture has a hint of a very nice gradient of light to it which is very nice.
However, if you are only concerned with these two shots or shots like these two in (B&W) than you can easily fix this in PS in less than 3 mins, which might be a nice option if you can't get more light.
Very nice pictures, you have a great eye -Keep it up
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Old 03-12-2009   #6
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Default Re: White Background White

You may not need more lights you may need a light meter instead. Keep in mind that exposure is based on a shade of gray (18% which is argued widely to be less or more). Thus really white like snow, sandy beaches, and white backgrounds tend to appear gray rather than white. Your white background should meter (or be exposed) about 2 stops more than "normal exposure" then it will turn white.

So depending on what kind of light control you are using simply adding more of them may not give you that white you are looking for. For example if you are using speedlights and iTTL or eTTL to light the background it will probably always be gray.

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Old 03-13-2009   #7
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Default Re: White Background White

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dookie View Post
To get the background whiter you will need to blast it with more light.
Ummm .. for the sake of clarification .. lets not say blast. The common thought among many photographers is to basically overexpose the background by "blasting" it with light. I'm not saying that dookie is saying that - I am just clarifying it. To get the very best understanding - I would check out this tutorial from the Camel's own Ben "Benji" Jones

Quote:
Originally Posted by Songman45 View Post
You may not need more lights you may need a light meter instead. Keep in mind that exposure is based on a shade of gray (18% which is argued widely to be less or more). Thus really white like snow, sandy beaches, and white backgrounds tend to appear gray rather than white. Your white background should meter (or be exposed) about 2 stops more than "normal exposure" then it will turn white
Agree wholeheartedly with Steve - you need to meter the background correctly against what the rest of your exposure will be. I'm no master - but here is a few images I posted that demonstrate metering correctly.
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Old 02-08-2011   #8
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Default Re: White Background White

I am wondering if anyone has done htis before and have a quick fstop setting to share with regard to making grey gradient on a white seamless as in the pictures below. I am wondering about the exact meter reading on the light spot on the background if average of the main and key light is, say 8 or 11?



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Old 02-08-2011   #9
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Default Re: White Background White

You don't need a fixed focal length lens. These days the zooms are very sharp. With a room that size you are going to be restricted with only one focal length. 20 feet sounds long but it really isn't. When you consider that you may have a background, that takes up two linear feet. A background light needs to be a foot or two from the background. The subject(s) might need to be four feet or more from the background light...that's 8 of the 20 feet used up, leaving you only about ten feet (you can't be right up against the wall) between your camera and subject (s). If you're shooting a small family, ten feet is not alot of space.

My recommendation is to go with a high quality zoom lens in the 14 to 135mm range... or 14 to 200mm. For studio work it doesn't have to be a fast lens. You will pay a premium for a 2.8 lens, so I wouldn't recommend it if you don't need it....not for studio work.
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Old 02-11-2011   #10
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Default Re: White Background White

The f-stop setting is not what causes the gradient, its about how the background is lit. If you have constant lights your settings will be different than 100ws lights which will be different from 2000ws lights. It all depends on your gear and your light settings.


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