Some advice please.
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Old 11-29-2016   #1
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Default Some advice please.

So with my fall outdoor pretty much done and no indoor space until January, I am renting a studio on an hourly basis on Monday.

The studio has constant lighting which I've never used. Also, they have a smoke machine I want to play with but have never used.

I know studio strobes but know little about constant light.

Any major differences? Any suggestions on using the smoke machine?

Thanks in advance.

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Old 11-29-2016   #2
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Default Re: Some advice please.

I've never used a smoke machine. But it'll probably be pretty cool to fool around with. I'm sure you'll think up some interesting ways to get some creative images.

If you're used to strobes, you just might find continuous lighting a bit limiting. Continuous lights just don't provide the same power of a strobe. Every brand and model is a bit different, some have more power than others, but over all, they don't come close to the output of a strobe.

So as a result, you probably won't be using ISO 100. Unless you're shooting still life or food or macro or something like that. At ISO 100 you might start to see movement in models and you'll get blurry/soft images. You'll just have to see how much light they put out, and increase your ISO as needed.

But if you're shooting macros. still life or products, put your camera on a tripod and let the shutter go wherever it needs to go. This is where the continuous lights really are great. You can see exactly what you're getting. Tether your camera, and examine each image as it comes up. Makes it so much easier for product shots, things like that. You can immediately see where you highlights and shadows are, what you're reflectors are doing etc. They're usually daylight balanced, so they'll be pretty close. But you can also use a gray card or a passport to make sure.
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Old 11-29-2016   #3
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Default Re: Some advice please.

Quote:
Originally Posted by nu2scene View Post
I've never used a smoke machine. But it'll probably be pretty cool to fool around with. I'm sure you'll think up some interesting ways to get some creative images.

If you're used to strobes, you just might find continuous lighting a bit limiting. Continuous lights just don't provide the same power of a strobe. Every brand and model is a bit different, some have more power than others, but over all, they don't come close to the output of a strobe.

So as a result, you probably won't be using ISO 100. Unless you're shooting still life or food or macro or something like that. At ISO 100 you might start to see movement in models and you'll get blurry/soft images. You'll just have to see how much light they put out, and increase your ISO as needed.

But if you're shooting macros. still life or products, put your camera on a tripod and let the shutter go wherever it needs to go. This is where the continuous lights really are great. You can see exactly what you're getting. Tether your camera, and examine each image as it comes up. Makes it so much easier for product shots, things like that. You can immediately see where you highlights and shadows are, what you're reflectors are doing etc. They're usually daylight balanced, so they'll be pretty close. But you can also use a gray card or a passport to make sure.
Thank you.
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24-105 f4L IS; 50mm f1.4; 70-200 f4L IS; 85mm f1.4; 55-250 IS;
Tamron 28-75 f2.8 IS ; Sekonic L-358;
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Old 11-29-2016   #4
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Default Re: Some advice please.

This is truly where what you see, is what you get !

Turn off the ambient lights, they will contaminate the images.

Expect low shutter speeds and/or higher iso. Best to use a tripod.

Light modifiers will work roughly the same, use light distance to subject to control the power of the lights.

Smoke ? The only thing I can offer is light from the sides.

Cheers, Don
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Old 11-30-2016   #5
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Default Re: Some advice please.

Thanks Don.

Interesting point about light power. On my strobes I adjust the output. Now I'll need to remember my math. LOL


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Canon 5D; 70D; 600D/T3i;
24-105 f4L IS; 50mm f1.4; 70-200 f4L IS; 85mm f1.4; 55-250 IS;
Tamron 28-75 f2.8 IS ; Sekonic L-358;
http://bilsen.zenfolio.com
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