THE TRUTH ABOUT PHOTOGRAPHIC LIGHTING- new!The Truth About Photographic Lighting An - Page 6
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Old 11-05-2013   #51
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Default Re: THE TRUTH ABOUT PHOTOGRAPHIC LIGHTING- new!The Truth About Photographic Lighting

Than you for passing on your knowledge you are very helpfull
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Old 11-08-2013   #52
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This is wonderful. It provide a lot of information for newcomer and experienced person. it a life time sharing experience.
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Old 12-29-2013   #53
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I really like your article =

I am really new to photography, and fully self taught. I have read so much info online about learning to use your camera in manual and understanding iso, wb, f-stop, metering, shooting raw, editing software ect. ect., that I forgot about lighting. Well it was there on the back of my mind, but maybe I was afraid to learn about it, because everything else seemed so confusing at first, that i thought lighting would be impossible to learn. And I also hear so many people say they are just natural light photographers. But now I am ready, but I am having a real hard time finding enough information online. Where do I start? Are there any good books or videos? Sorry for all the questions at once.
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Old 12-29-2013   #54
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jacynthe View Post
I really like your article =

I am really new to photography, and fully self taught. I have read so much info online about learning to use your camera in manual and understanding iso, wb, f-stop, metering, shooting raw, editing software ect. ect., that I forgot about lighting. Well it was there on the back of my mind, but maybe I was afraid to learn about it, because everything else seemed so confusing at first, that i thought lighting would be impossible to learn. And I also hear so many people say they are just natural light photographers. But now I am ready, but I am having a real hard time finding enough information online. Where do I start? Are there any good books or videos? Sorry for all the questions at once.
I'm not Ed but I can answer your question. One of the best books on the subject is Understanding Exposure by Brian Peterson. The text is comprehensive so you may find parts to be remedial. Understanding light is sort of two fold, there is the quantitative or volume of light necessary; then, there is the quality of light which is the artistic part.

There are many good resources for video tutorials. One of my favorites is "MAC On Campus". The MAC group is the parent company of many fine brand names and since they produce the videos, those products are prominently used. The results can be achieved without the specific brands mentioned, the tutorials have substance and are not simply advertisements for products.

Best wishes on your endeavors.
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Old 12-29-2013   #55
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Thank you
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Old 12-29-2013   #56
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I read a few books about natural light, and how to use it, adjusting the light with reflectors, ....
But for me, I only really started to "see light", after I bought a speedlite and umbrella.
The sun is always there, and it shines (most of the time) as it is, so you can take the easy way, pose in a somewhat good position, and most of the time the output is acceptable.

But if you buy some kind of light (a simple manual speedlight is all you need), you are forced to think about the position of the light, the hardness, the power, highlight/shadow ratios, .....
After using 1 speedlight for a while, I took a great step forward with my natural light portraits also. I get a better grip on lighting situations, recognizing possible traps and how to avoid them.
I also don't have as much time a day as I would, so most of the time, when the kid is asleep, I have time, but no sun anymore.

Good luck

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Old 12-29-2013   #57
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Originally Posted by jacynthe View Post
And I also hear so many people say they are just natural light photographers. But now I am ready, but I am having a real hard time finding enough information online. Where do I start? Are there any good books or videos? Sorry for all the questions at once.
Look into books by Joe McNally. He has some good illustrations of lighting, including some basic discussions of quality of light.

There are many ways to approach learning about light. I'm more of a kinesthetic learner, which means I learn best by doing. Books and the internet are OK, but there's nothing like getting out there and trying things. I also learn as much by figuring out why some things don't work as by studying what does work.

There are a number of exercises that will help. For instance, at Art Center we were assigned to take the same scene at different times of the day. I shot at daybreak, 9:00 am, 10:00 am, noon, 1,3,5 and just before and after sunset. This was no mean feat, because we had to shoot with a 4x5 view camera! I then selected roughly the same time of day (I think it was 5:00 pm) and shot the same scene in sunlight (point source), partly cloudy and cloudy (broad source) conditions.

For portraits, you can start simply with one fairly large reflector and shoot late in the day, during the "golden hour". Place the sun behind for rim light and use the reflector for fill. Place the reflector as close as you can, just out of frame. Try it to the left, right, center, low and high. Start shooting about 45 minutes before dusk and shoot until just after sunset, or when shooting at f2.8 at 1/60 ISO 800 isn't enough.

I shoot mostly natural light. Be aware when you look at some natural light photos, what you see is no where near straight out of the camera (SOOC). They often have had extensive post processing. You might be disappointed with your efforts in comparison, when actually it is PP that has made the difference. Of course, while learning light, you'll need to also be learning post processing to enhance your images. Still you have to start with a strong, well lit image to get good results.
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Old 01-30-2014   #58
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Quote:
Originally Posted by aceto81 View Post
I read a few books about natural light, and how to use it, adjusting the light with reflectors, ....
But for me, I only really started to "see light", after I bought a speedlite and umbrella.
The sun is always there, and it shines (most of the time) as it is, so you can take the easy way, pose in a somewhat good position, and most of the time the output is acceptable.

But if you buy some kind of light (a simple manual speedlight is all you need), you are forced to think about the position of the light, the hardness, the power, highlight/shadow ratios, .....
After using 1 speedlight for a while, I took a great step forward with my natural light portraits also. I get a better grip on lighting situations, recognizing possible traps and how to avoid them.
I also don't have as much time a day as I would, so most of the time, when the kid is asleep, I have time, but no sun anymore.

Good luck

Ace
This is exactly how it happened with me.....still learning though.
Controlling the light is the key......and you can't always control natural light/sunlight.
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Old 01-30-2014   #59
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This business of combining natural light and strobe used to be very simple in terms of just providing flash fill. As a long time wedding photographer, I can tell you that the technique was a godsend especially in BAD overhead high noon sunlight. The flash would at least make those dreadful shadows washing down the subjects’ faces more transparent. This helped when the couple came out of the church at high noon or thereabout and in order to capture all the confetti/rice throwing and hugs and kisses, I had to contend with harsh lighting. For the actual formal shots I would seek out shade or an indoor location.

Another method, which nowadays does not seem to be used or recognized as much is simply using late afternoon sunlight light, when it is warm and directional, as the main light and again simply using flash fill to control the ratio and produce the desired mood. Theses are simple techniques and good exposures and ratios can be easily controlled and achieved simply by adjusting the flash to fire at a few stops below the sunlight exposure. A bit more delicate control is required in open shade or mildly overcast conditions but this can be mastered successfully with a bit of practice. In all of theses cases, so far, the flash can be simply left on the camera and the ratio can be easily controlled by adjusting the light output of the flash.

Nowadays, we speak of OFF CAMERA FLASH and daylight mixtures. All of this becomes more complex because we are now using the flash equipment as the MAIN LIGHT! We are not simply augmenting or filling in the natural light but we are blending in the ambient light to balance with our somewhat simulated main light. If this is not done seamlessly the images will begin to look somehow of sorts. It is easy for imbalances to occur causing disunity of lighting, too dark or too bright ambiences that all result in an artificial look.

Again, with practice and experience all of this can be mastered and the technique itself is handy when we have to shoot out of doors and the right kinda lighting is just not there or coming in form a direction that is not compatible with the subject position that we need in order to obtain a good background rendition or good “bokeh”.

I oftentimes do this with a simple off camera bare bulb flash which negates the need to set up soft-boxes boxes or umbrellas on windy days and when working on the fly at a wedding.

This may surprise y’all but my absolutely favorite method of shooting out of doors, except at dusk, is the use of simple reflector panels rather than flash. I like to back light the subjects with afternoon sunlight and redirect the sunlight from a 30 degree up to 90 degree angle from the camera/subject axis and create a nice wrap around effect or bring in another reflector as a fill source. Oh- I do all of my locations shoots with one or two assistants- no light stands and very fast implementation of the reflector placements. What you see is what you get- no surprises and the results are seamless.

This works well on sunny and hazy-sunny days when the afternoon sun is directional. Oftentimes in open shade or light overcast conditions a kinda magical wrap around effect appears that requires no fill or augmentation at all. You will know it when you see it!

Ed
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Old 01-30-2014   #60
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Default Re: THE TRUTH ABOUT PHOTOGRAPHIC LIGHTING- new!The Truth About Photographic Lighting

Ed
I like the simplicity - yet seemingly effective way - of approaching an outdoor shoot using the available light and not adding flash. Reflectors and positioning is what I should be thinking about more often than not.

Sometimes it's a case of having acquired equipment and therefore thinking that it needs to be used.

Of course, it's not the answer for all situations, but certainly is a good reminder that keeping things simple is often the best approach.


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