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Old 12-03-2014   #11
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Default Re: Scanning 35mm negatives?? FRUSTRATION

Yes, unfortunately 72dpi images are all but useless for anything except, possibly, facebook but you would still do better from your iPhone.

That said, I have been scanning 6X6 and 35mm images for years. For 6X6 (Hassleblad)images I use 2,400dpi and get file sizes of about 80 Megabytes/image. For 35mm I use 4,800dpi and end up with images of about 115 Megabytes. I have found that going higher (4,800 dpi for 6X6, for example) really does not buy you much, except a much larger file 320 MB for a 6X6 at 4,800dpi. I always scan as TIFFs rather than JPEGs because they are not compressed. One can always do JPEGs from them later.

I use a Microtek i800 Pro with a scanning software package from SilverFast (a German company) It allows me do scan in batches ( 12 slides/negs at a time for 6X6 or 24 35mm in slide mounts) putting each in a separate file and allows individual corrections for each image. I admit, it is a pain. Setting up a run of 24 35mm slides takes about an hour (cleaning slides, framing each, adjusting exposure in the scanner) and another hour for the scan to run. For those I wish to print I always process further with Photoshop. It is expensive, about $7-800 for a high quality scanner, about $200 for the scanning software (Silverfast Ai) and, of course, you need big disks to store the result. I use a 1Terabyte RAID 1 array for redundancy. I use a 24 inch iMac with a Datacolor Spyder monitor calibrator. I also have a standard transparancy and print to cal the scanner (another $75). I print on an Epson R3000 printer.

The alternative, of course, is to use a custom scanning service to scan your images. Unfortunately this gets VERY expensive , very quickly.

There are also small scanners for 35mm, (they are more like dedicated digital cameras actually), and cost in the $100-$200 range. I have not tried them but they have 8 Megapixel resolution and might just do the job for you, after all, it wasn't too long ago that we thought that a 8MP camera was the cats meow! You can find them at B&H Photovideo.

Last edited by JohnnyFry; 12-03-2014 at 04:06 PM.. Reason: Additional info
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Old 01-20-2015   #12
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Default Re: Scanning 35mm negatives?? FRUSTRATION

Scanning small negs has a number of challenges. if your digital camera has
upwards of 12 MP, set up a "slide duper" rig. These vary from a very simple
T-mount device to a camera on an elevator stand using macro bellows and
a controllable light source. Anywhere along that spectrum is better than a
flatbed scanner. Some dedicated film scanners use a very sharp source of
illumination. Negs are not meant to be lit that way. Tiny TINY scratches, or
"micro" dust that would never show up in a print can be "enhanced" by the
narrow-slit/linear-led illumination sources of some film scanners. The broad
illumination sources in lab enlargers do not have that problem, and all the
duping rigs I've used use illumination thaz at least as broad as is found in an
enlarger. When these rigs were used in the film era, special films were used
to avoid contrast build-up and exagerated color saturation. Today, you can
just set the controls on your digicam to the same end.

If that bit about special films escapes your grasp, thinka this: Shoot a scene
in [frinstintz] Kodachrome. OK, you just "KandyKromed" a piece of the world.
If you use more Kodahrome to shoot the "duplicate" slide, you've just double
KandyKromed the scene... a useless bizarrely exagerated result, It's not really
any sorta "duplicate" in any sense of that word's meaning. So, we used those
special Duping Film[s]. Today, you just dial up the necessary characteristics
on your digicam [or in post]. You have a lot more control over a camera than
over a scanner. And a camera exposure is quick. A scanner exposure is just
plain tediously slow. So a duping rig is not only versatile, it's fast.
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Old 01-31-2015   #13
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Default Re: Scanning 35mm negatives?? FRUSTRATION

I scan my old 35mm negatives and slides using an Epson V600 Photo scanner. I stick with 3200DPI mostly and save as Tiffs. I use Photoshop elements with Topaz plugins for post processing. For more than archiving I need to post process scans for at least white balance adjustment, noise and scratch removal. Because of the time involved I've learnt to be selective which shots get the attention.
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Old 01-31-2015   #14
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Has anyone got any settings that they can share for scanning 35mm negs on an Epson V550? My first attempt wasn't that great (could have been that the film was long expired, though) but I wondered if anyone has settings that they regularly use? It would save me going through a lot of trial & error!

My intention is to process in PS CC and then print at least 11x8.5, so I'm assuming a 4800 or higher dpi.
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Old 01-31-2015   #15
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Default Re: Scanning 35mm negatives?? FRUSTRATION

I have a Nikon super coolscan 4000 that I will let go for $500.00. It needs a firewire connection. It's very slow but give superior results.
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Old 01-31-2015   #16
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Default Re: Scanning 35mm negatives?? FRUSTRATION

Quote:
Originally Posted by goodfellow View Post
Has anyone got any settings that they can share for scanning 35mm negs on an Epson V550? My first attempt wasn't that great (could have been that the film was long expired, though) but I wondered if anyone has settings that they regularly use? It would save me going through a lot of trial & error!

My intention is to process in PS CC and then print at least 11x8.5, so I'm assuming a 4800 or higher dpi.
Despite what the scanner makers tell you about flat bed scanners with film adapters, the only way to get quality results, IMO, is to use a dedicated negative / slide film scanner whose driver software includes ICE. If you can find a Nikon Coolscan V / LS5000 or the equivalent from Minotla or Canon you would do well. Just be careful when buying certain models to make sure you can get a driver that will work or can be made to work with Win7 or Win8. Nikon stopped driver support after Vista although there are ways to get the scanners to work with Win7 & 8.
Cheers, Murray
Cheers, Murray
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Old 01-31-2015   #17
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Default Re: Scanning 35mm negatives?? FRUSTRATION

Here are the settings I use for my V600 for negatives and slides.
I am using the latest Epson Scan software and not a third party scanning software like Silverfast or Vuescan. These may produce better results faster.
Settings for Epson Scan:
Color Negative film
48 bit color
3200dpi
Trimming on
Tiff storage format
Unsharp mask -low. All other adjustments set to off. I often have Digtal ICE off but can assist for damaged negatives - it takes extra time so try it and see.
Configuration settings:
Color control - Continuous auto exposure with auto exposure level set to low.

Make sure the scanner and negative is as free from dust as possible. For this scanner and my negatives/slides going above 3200dpi doesn't achieve much. It gives a 4544x3008 pixel image (~ 13Mpixel camera output) a 15x10" print at 300ppi.
Post Processing:
1) adjust white balance. First try Adobe camera raw (ACR) then set black and white points in PSE levels plus a gray point if possible. This can be the toughest step for me.
2) Noise reduction - use Topaz deNoise or your favorite noise reduction software.
4) Topaz Adjust - detail, adaptive exposure, color etc all help. General "simple pop" is a start. A curves adjustment after this (full Photoshop or Faststone) can help.
5) Topaz Clarity sometimes for a bit of extra pop if needed.
6) Clean up scratches etc with the content aware healing brush
7) Add some extra sharpening if desired
This can all take up to 30 minutes depending how fussy you are so not for mass processing!! The scanning time on the above settings isn't too bad so you could archive a bunch of scans and process as required.
An example: Negative taken 1988 on Rhodes (Avenue of the Knights) with a Pentax SLR. I have reduced the scans for upload file efficiency
Plain scan:
img134-red.jpg
Processed scan:
img134-ed2-red.jpg
Crop of the processed scan at full resolution:
img134-ed2_cr-red.jpg

Last edited by mshoot; 02-01-2015 at 02:33 AM.. Reason: typo
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Old 02-01-2015   #18
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Default Re: Scanning 35mm negatives?? FRUSTRATION

Mshoot's workflow and results seem just right. It all
takes time, and good tools, but photography is not
an instantaneous process. Instant capture, sure, but
capture isn't a finished product. Quality takes time.
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Old 02-01-2015   #19
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Default Re: Scanning 35mm negatives?? FRUSTRATION

Thanks Mshoot. Just what I was looking for. I was also confused by the fact that I could set Target Size to anything other than Original with a 4800 dpi scan, which was giving me a 1in sq final image. But I realised it's the pixel dimensions that are important for final resizing for printing.
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Old 02-01-2015   #20
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Default Re: Scanning 35mm negatives?? FRUSTRATION

Quote:
Originally Posted by mistermonday View Post
Despite what the scanner makers tell you about flat bed scanners with film adapters, the only way to get quality results, IMO, is to use a dedicated negative / slide film scanner whose driver software includes ICE. If you can find a Nikon Coolscan V / LS5000 or the equivalent from Minotla or Canon you would do well. Just be careful when buying certain models to make sure you can get a driver that will work or can be made to work with Win7 or Win8. Nikon stopped driver support after Vista although there are ways to get the scanners to work with Win7 & 8.
Cheers, Murray
Cheers, Murray
Thanks, but I was looking for info on my current scanner, not looking to buy a new one. There's only so much expense SWMBO will accept.


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