Jewelry - Necklace c&c please
PhotoCamel: Your friendly photo community, with free discussion forums, digital photography reviews, photo sharing, galleries, downloads, blogs, photography contests, and prizes.
 


Go Back   PhotoCamel - Your Friendly Photography Forum > Photography by Genre: Critique and Discussion > Commercial

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 02-07-2010   #1
Vicuna
 
fotoken's Avatar
 
Posts: 56
CamelKarma: 2176
Editing OK?: Ask first
Constructive Critique?: Yes
Default Jewelry - Necklace c&c please

My wife started to make Jewelry...so naturally I said I would photograph it . Please let me know what you think.

__________________
Members don't see ads in threads. Register for your free account today and become a member of PhotoCamel to open up the site's many benefits and features.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg Pearl-necklace.jpg (144.3 KB, 337 views)
__________________
Ken
-----------

Once photography enters your bloodstream, it's like a disease. Anonymous
fotoken is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-08-2010   #2
Photocamel Master
 
Ed Shapiro's Avatar
 
Location: Ottawa, Ontario Canada
Posts: 6,718
CamelKarma: 5188665
Editing OK?: Ask First
Constructive Critique?: Yes
Default Re: Jewelry - Necklace c&c please

Hi Ken!

Good start! The pears or beads are the motif of the jewelry piece and should be more dominant in the composition- it should appear in the upper 1/3 of your composition. It seems that you have used an umbrella as you main light source. A soft box would be a better choice- used very close to the subject and overhead you set- it would better define th shape and color of the pearls or beads- it is hard to tell with both light and dark fields on the same subject.

Ed
__________________
Ed Shapiro - Master Photographer
Ottawa, Canada
Ed Shapiro is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-08-2010   #3
Vicuna
 
nu-B Photo's Avatar
 
Posts: 216
CamelKarma: 1447
Editing OK?: Ask First
Constructive Critique?: Yes
Default Re: Jewelry - Necklace c&c please

x2 what Ed said..

Plus I noticed that the ribbon up top is lit better than than the perils, I think it should be the other way around if you were trying to draw attention the jewelry. Not to mention the perils and other stones would sparkle more
__________________
- Jeremy
JAXVPS Web Hosting Solutions - http://www.jaxvps.com
Offering Premium SSD Shared, Reseller, and VPS Hosting Since 2010
nu-B Photo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-08-2010   #4
Vicuna
 
fotoken's Avatar
 
Posts: 56
CamelKarma: 2176
Editing OK?: Ask first
Constructive Critique?: Yes
Default Re: Jewelry - Necklace c&c please

Hi Ed,

Thank you for your comments. I actually had the necklace directly under a 3' square diffusion panel. I can see (now that you mentioned it) how the shape of the reflection is altering the round appearance of the imitation pearls. I think this calls for a re-shoot!
__________________
Ken
-----------

Once photography enters your bloodstream, it's like a disease. Anonymous
fotoken is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-08-2010   #5
Vicuna
 
fotoken's Avatar
 
Posts: 56
CamelKarma: 2176
Editing OK?: Ask first
Constructive Critique?: Yes
Default Re: Jewelry - Necklace c&c please

Hi Jeremy!

I agree with you and I actually had the same thought and posted it anyway. Thank you for your comments.
__________________
Ken
-----------

Once photography enters your bloodstream, it's like a disease. Anonymous
fotoken is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-08-2010   #6
Llama
 
GD1313's Avatar
 
Location: Kaslo, BC Canada
Posts: 625
CamelKarma: 1429
Editing OK?: Yes
Constructive Critique?: Yes
Default Re: Jewelry - Necklace c&c please

I too make jewelry and would love to learn how to photograph pieces to show them to best advantage. I like the necklace that your wife made. I am looking forward to seeing more of her work and learning from you and others how to photograph my work.
GD1313 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-09-2010   #7
Photocamel Master
 
Ed Shapiro's Avatar
 
Location: Ottawa, Ontario Canada
Posts: 6,718
CamelKarma: 5188665
Editing OK?: Ask First
Constructive Critique?: Yes
Default Re: Jewelry - Necklace c&c please

The photography of jewelry entails many commercial photography techniques because of the diversity of the products themselves. You may be photographing gemstones, beads of every conceivable shape or material, glass, pearls, gold, silver, platinum, and all kinds of metals and materials all with various surface textures, reflectivity color and shape. There are all sorts of chains in a variety of sizes and configurations and other elements such as engravings, the shape of ring settings and even wooden surfaces and grains. In some instances you may have combinations of many kinds of materials within a single piece in groups of pieces to be included in one photograph.

Everything counts- composition, exposure, presentation and more, however the main challenge in this kind of work is the lighting. When photographing highly polished or reflective materials you have to firstly consider lighting fields- there are dark field and light field approaches and sometimes combinations of both. You need to remember that when you are photographing highly reflective materials, it is like photographing a mirror- you are really photographing what is reflected in the mirror as opposed to photographing the glass or silvered surface if the mirror itself, If the mirror is in a frame you also have to consider how you are going to bring detail out in the frame.

If your mirror is reflecting white or light gray seamless paper or the light from a very large soft box- those are the shades you are going to represent the mirror in the final image. If the reflection in the mirror is dark- such as the reflection of dark studio space or a dark wall, the mirror surface is going to be represented as very dark gray or black, The former technique is called light field and the latter is dark field. This applies to many reflective objects such as coins, certain types of flat jewelry and shiny metal objects in general.

This is all based on the "angle of incidence" laws which is part of the physics of light. The rule states that the angle of incidence is equal to the angle of reflection, thus, if your light is striking the object or subject of the photograph from the far side of the object at 45 degrees the reflection of that light will be most observed if the camera is also at 45 degrees to the front of the object. This may sound like a lot of technobable but all you need is a small mirror, and a light source and once you start moving things around on a simple set. it won't take much time to "get it"! You can use the most advantageous angle of incidence to render the surface of you subject(s) and by placing th camera at various angles of reflection you can either feature the reflections or avoid them as you wish.

The reason I am talking about mirrors and using a mirror as a learning tool is because a flat mirror will give you a very clear idea of how the angle of incidence theory and the light and dark field methods work. Now we will talk about jewelery.

Most jewelry is not usually comprised of flat surfaces- even seemingly flat componants may have beveled edges wich will be at different angles to you light source. Since you want to show dimensionality in you photographs some of you subjects will be a combination of what and dark field lighting. You don't want to necessarily show the dark fields as jet black, so you will need some flat reflectors to fill in the dark fields but not completely- you are looking for a realistic lighting ratio between the light and dark fields.

Lets say that we are photographing simple wedding rings. Although they are round in shape, the metal may be flat (from edge to edge), totally round or half round. Each of theses shapes of the material may require slight variations in lighting in order to preserve the reality of theses various shapes. A shiny gold bad may require slightly different lighting than a Florentine gold band in order to bring out the surface texture of the latter material- add a diamond setting to the right and you have to compromise in order to render the gemstone properly.

Round beads have similar problems to any round object. The reflect light from various angles because of their shape and if the proper focal length of lens and the proper camera/subject distance is not used round objects may look allot like disks or circles rather that ball shaped objects. With beads and pearls, I fine my best light source is a very large soft box use as close to the subject as possible. This light should be mounted on a boom stand and placed directly over the subject and then moved backward until a soft clean drop shadow appears in from of the beads. The hight of the light can be moved up and down until you see a pleasant lighting reflecting from the beads- you are looking for broad highlights that won't change the shape or color of the beads or place very strong catch-lights as if the beads were "white eyed peas"- I did not say "black eyed peas because that would entail a dark field treatment or the use of a gobo in the wrong place. A white reflector or fill card should create a sense of transparency in the shadows.

The lens thing- If you use a telephoto or long focal length or zoom setting and place the camera too far away from the subject- the camera will not see the roundness of the subject. If you make believe theses were cubic shaped beads, the camera would not see the "sides" of the cubes and render them as squares. We want to see a bit "around the beads". I don't recommend a wide angle lens but a normal to slightly shorter focal length my work better. As experiment, try this with a larger round object such as a round perfume bottle or a billiard ball. Try it with a tennis ball and practice rendering the texture.

Other tips- On light colored beads and and highly polished objects, a red or similarly high chroma color may reflect directly on the the subject and change its entire color. You may not like the drop shadow that I mentioned above, In theses cases, you can elevate the items on an elevated sheet of glass which will shot the background color whiteout colored reflections or drop shadows. Here careful use of the angle of incidence rule will get you through.

Oftentimes gold will show as silver in the middle-tones- a gold reflector will help with that.

Get a good jewelers cloth and clean all the Keeley throughly and then dust it with a camel hair or static brush. In close up or macro modes, you would be surprised what can show up.

For very fine chain, I use dental probes to arrange them on the set.

In general, start with that big soft box if you can- by moving it around and feathering it you can effectively light many different surfaces and textures. As with foods and other still life images, you may want to mix had light with soft light to bring up textures and supply more dramatic highlights. A spot of flood light comming in at a steeper angle of incidence- skimming across the surfaces of your items may help. Again, practice and experimentation will yield a set of procedures for you to follow each time you need to set up for jewelery.

If you lighting field does not show enough dimensionality and everything seem too flat or are blending into the background, you can hang some black ribbon at strategic angles to create darker fields where you need them.

Some photographers like to "tent" the entire object- that means surrounding the product with white seamless paper and bouncing the light off the inner walls of the tent or shooting through a tent made of a translucent material. I reserve that method for large highly reflective items such a chrome finished electrical kettles or toasters which would reflect the entire studio including the photographer like a security mirror in a convenience store. Well Alfred Hitchcock appeared (walked through a scene) in all of his movies but I think my clients would tale a dim view of my image appearing an all of their small appliances.



I hope this helps! Ed
__________________
Ed Shapiro - Master Photographer
Ottawa, Canada
Ed Shapiro is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-23-2010   #8
Vicuna
 
Location: Minneapolis
Posts: 120
CamelKarma: 424
Editing OK?: Yes
Constructive Critique?: Yes
Default Re: Jewelry - Necklace c&c please

I think you should choose a different background. The red shaggy material doesn't fit imo and makes the jewelry feel cheaper. Good luck.
__________________
I shoot with a Let's Go Barbie disposable camera,
I use a super special 18-55mm lens made out of tree bark and unicorn farts
I start uncontrollable fires for my lighting
p.s. I think your gear is cool

member of ASMP
www.kevinkaminphoto.com
photography blog
kkamin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-23-2010   #9
Vicuna
 
fotoken's Avatar
 
Posts: 56
CamelKarma: 2176
Editing OK?: Ask first
Constructive Critique?: Yes
Default Re: Jewelry - Necklace c&c please

Quote:
Originally Posted by kkamin View Post
I think you should choose a different background. The red shaggy material doesn't fit imo and makes the jewelry feel cheaper. Good luck.
I will be trying something different. Thank you for your comment.
__________________
Ken
-----------

Once photography enters your bloodstream, it's like a disease. Anonymous
fotoken is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-19-2010   #10
Camel Breath
 
jfrancho's Avatar
 
Location: Rochester, NY
Posts: 11,666
CamelKarma: 4939
Editing OK?: No
Constructive Critique?: Yes
Default Re: Jewelry - Necklace c&c please

Go simple at first with the backgrounds. Once you figure out how to control the lighting, and feature the stones, metal, and craftsmanship, then start messing with backgrounds. Seamless white paper and paraffin wax will be your best friends.


__________________
Members don't see ads in threads. Register for your free account today and become a member of PhotoCamel to open up the site's many benefits and features.
__________________
<)))))><
jfrancho is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

« PhotoCamel - Your Friendly Photography Forum > Photography by Genre: Critique and Discussion > Commercial »


Share this topic:


Tags
jewelry, necklace, product
Thread Tools
Display Modes