Dust on black acrylic?
PhotoCamel: Your friendly photo community, with free discussion forums, digital photography reviews, photo sharing, galleries, downloads, blogs, photography contests, and prizes.
 


Go Back   PhotoCamel - Your Friendly Photography Forum > Photography by Genre: Critique and Discussion > Commercial

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 09-12-2014   #1
Vicuna
 
DIGITALphotoconcept's Avatar
 
Posts: 83
CamelKarma: 194888
Editing OK?: Ask First
Constructive Critique?: Yes
Default Dust on black acrylic?

While I shoot products commercially I have never shot jewelry and while I am happy with my test shot I had a tough time keeping my black acrylic base clear of dust...do you guys have any tricks that you would be will to share? Is anti-static spray adequate?


__________________
Members don't see ads in threads. Register for your free account today and become a member of PhotoCamel to open up the site's many benefits and features.
__________________
George B. Ross
"Coffee's for Closers"

RI Photographer | RI Wedding Photographer
DIGITALphotoconcept is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-12-2014   #2
Camel Breath
 
Steven G Webb's Avatar
 
Location: South Carolina
Posts: 12,784
CamelKarma: 1206139
Editing OK?: Yes
Constructive Critique?: Yes
Default Re: Dust on black acrylic?

Are staticmaster brushes still made? Those things were the bomb back in the day.
__________________
Have you ever stopped to think and forgot to start again?

Facebook

Camel Equine Group

My Equine Album

Fireworks Album

Steven G Webb is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-12-2014   #3
Bactrian
 
R. House's Avatar
 
Location: Escondido, USA
Posts: 1,768
CamelKarma: 290264
Editing OK?: Yes
Constructive Critique?: Yes
Default Re: Dust on black acrylic?

I used to hand letter on acrylics and the static would pull the enamel right out of the brush before it even touched the surface. the solution was to lay the sheet on damp newspaper or lay a damp rag under one corner. That would eliminate the static.
__________________
Become silent to hear your truth...
R. House is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-12-2014   #4
F1 Camel
 
Tat2Duck's Avatar
 
Location: CT, USA
Posts: 2,505
CamelKarma: 6617978
Editing OK?: No
Constructive Critique?: Yes
Default Re: Dust on black acrylic?

Quote:
Originally Posted by R. House View Post
I used to hand letter on acrylics and the static would pull the enamel right out of the brush stsh before it even touched the surface. the solution was to lay the sheet on damp newspaper or lay a damp rag under one corner. That would eliminate the static.
I've never heard of this trick. I'll have to try it.

Whenever I use acrylic sheets for my product photography I give it a good polishing with an acrylic cleaner. It does a fantastic job at getting rid of fingerprints and other blemishes and it gives the surface a smooth satiny finish that makes controlling dust easier.

I'm not a big fan of canned air but in some instances it works. For jewelry work I rely on brushes. A dust free studio also helps. Try to keep airflow down around your shooting table. Finally, the clone tool in your favorite photo editing program will be your best friend.
Tat2Duck is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-12-2014   #5
PhotoCamel Supporter DONATED
Photocamel Master
 
zemlin's Avatar
 
Location: Indianapolis, Indiana
Posts: 6,826
CamelKarma: 7045525
Editing OK?: Yes
Constructive Critique?: Yes
Default Re: Dust on black acrylic?

I bought black acrylic. Used it once, and hated the dust and little scratches. I painted the back of a sheet of glass black. Much easier to keep clean - and flatter. I thought there would be issues with double reflections, but others assured me it was not so. They were right.

I don't do much product work on black, but I have this that was shot on the glass.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg _KZ18507_camel.jpg (197.9 KB, 244 views)
zemlin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-12-2014   #6
F1 Camel
 
Tat2Duck's Avatar
 
Location: CT, USA
Posts: 2,505
CamelKarma: 6617978
Editing OK?: No
Constructive Critique?: Yes
Default Re: Dust on black acrylic?

Quote:
Originally Posted by zemlin View Post
I bought black acrylic. Used it once, and hated the dust and little scratches. I painted the back of a sheet of glass black. Much easier to keep clean - and flatter. I thought there would be issues with double reflections, but others assured me it was not so. They were right.
This sounds like a possible solution. I use a plain piece of glass all the time. More often than I do my acrylics. They get pretty beat up. How does a painted glass surface hold up to wear and tear?
Tat2Duck is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-13-2014   #7
PhotoCamel Supporter DONATED
Photocamel Master
 
zemlin's Avatar
 
Location: Indianapolis, Indiana
Posts: 6,826
CamelKarma: 7045525
Editing OK?: Yes
Constructive Critique?: Yes
Default Re: Dust on black acrylic?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tat2Duck View Post
This sounds like a possible solution. I use a plain piece of glass all the time. More often than I do my acrylics. They get pretty beat up. How does a painted glass surface hold up to wear and tear?
Subject goes on the glass side. Paint is on the back. Tape black paper on the back to protect the paint from handling.
zemlin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-13-2014   #8
Photocamel Master
 
Ed Shapiro's Avatar
 
Location: Ottawa, Ontario Canada
Posts: 6,718
CamelKarma: 5188665
Editing OK?: Ask First
Constructive Critique?: Yes
Default Re: Dust on black acrylic?

A few ideas: As Karl mentioned, it is better not to use black acrylic materials because of dust issues and go to plate glass with black backing paper- I even have a piece of black mirror glass. Sometimes, however, I have to pull out the old sheet of black Plexiglas or Lexan because the product is, unlike jewelry, big and heavy. What’s worse is when the products themselves are made of acrylic or other polymers or plastics that are also susceptible to static and dust issues.

My solutions are form relics of the old wet darkrooms and their glass negative carriers in those pesky condenser enlargers that seemed to attract every bit of dust, hair and anything else in a 10 mile radius of the darkroom. So… I used those orange anti-static cloths on the glass carriers and the negatives as well- see the next paragraph.

There were and still are those orange colored anti-static cloths which are impregnated with some kind of chemical- one wipe and all the dust is gone and won’t come back for a little while. They used to be marketed by Ilford but I have seen them in camera shops on those miscellaneous accessory display boards. Don’t use them on lenses- they leave a residue!

The next weapon is compressed air but not the canned spray stuff- those add insult to injury by spewing their waxen-like propellant on things and that makes matters worse. I have a small filtered compressor in the studio that I used for lacquering prints (now I use lamination), powering the airbrush (now we use PhotoShop) but it is still good for blowing dust off of things. A cylinder of compressed medical air (no metallic or other fragments within the cylinder) and a regulator does a good job as well. Oh- NEVER- EVER use theses devices on you camera’s sensor but they are great for lenses!

If you can dig up any of the “high voltage” anti static darkroom devices of the past, online or hidden away in an old basement darkroom- WOW! I am lucky enough to have my old ones. One works off the compressor- the air is sent through a transformer box and a length of coiled plastic tubing with a nozzle at its end comes for the box- the air flow is activated by a small button valve on the nozzle- MAGIC- no more dust. I have another model that has a brush on the end of a high voltage probe that works surprisingly well. Theses units are well insulated and safe. The problem is- go find one!

The Staticmaster brand brushes were said to have a radioactive element of some kind above the brush. At one point they were deemed to be dangerous and may have been removed from the market- I don’t remember what the outcome of that was. I suppose one brush would not be all that dangerous but a case load of them being shipped to the dealers may have caused a whole lot of clicking on the Geiger counter!

Well- next time I am gonna try House’s wet newspaper trick and/or run a humidifier in the room. My lovely wife suggested my bathing in Head and Shoulders Shampoo and refrain from using my threadbare old and “filthy” army (OD) shirt as darkroom attire in order to cut down on the dust! Well- this cut the dust down by 25%- it did- not a word of lie! I think she finally threw the shirt in the garbage- too bad- it had my name stenciled on it!

Ed
__________________
Ed Shapiro - Master Photographer
Ottawa, Canada
Ed Shapiro is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-20-2014   #9
Llama
 
photolando's Avatar
 
Location: Orlando
Posts: 740
CamelKarma: 455110
Editing OK?: Ask First
Constructive Critique?: Yes
Default Re: Dust on black acrylic?

As long as what your shooting has a little weight to it, a small fan can help. It makes it so no dust settles as you set up. It keeps blowing it off.
__________________
Mike Collins
photolando is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-30-2014   #10
Camel Breath
 
BambersImages's Avatar
 
Location: West country, UK.
Posts: 28,567
CamelKarma: 58394711
Editing OK?: Ask First
Constructive Critique?: Yes
Default Re: Dust on black acrylic?

Very cool spider, Karl. I'm going to try the painted glass.


__________________
Members don't see ads in threads. Register for your free account today and become a member of PhotoCamel to open up the site's many benefits and features.
__________________
Constructive C & C is very welcome.

BambersImages Flickr
Etsy Shop Print Sales

Life is too short to spend time with people who suck the happiness out of you.
“Happiness is a habit – cultivate it.” ~ Elbert Hubbar
A Camera puts a frame around life. ~ Joel Meyerowitz
BambersImages is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

« PhotoCamel - Your Friendly Photography Forum > Photography by Genre: Critique and Discussion > Commercial »


Share this topic:


Tags
jewelry, product
Thread Tools
Display Modes