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Old 09-11-2011   #11
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Default Re: Shooting the impossible (mirrored cylinder)

I usually do not recommend dulling spray because if your subject is polished o a mirror-like finish it will look like a brushed finish or matte finish. The concept to recognize is that when you are photographing a highly polished surface you are actually photographing the reflexions of the surrounding surfaces and objects, therefore the tent method that Brooks is recommending is the way to go. In most cases the reflections are comming in from the sides but in the object you are photographing, some of the unwanted reflections are comming from the bottom so the bottom of the area in the tent must be considered. Check things out from the camera position- sometimes I use a yard stick and move it around beneath and to the sides of the tent- it is easier to detect the source of the unwanted reflections.

I use the same material on all surfaces of the tent so that there is no shift in color. Sometimes, things can be too well tented so the object may blend into the background. The remedy for that is to strategically hang some strips of black ribbon in the tent so that their reflection(s) will give a bit more shape to the object.

Sometimes I use small reflector cards to bright up black or dark colored parts of the equipment being photographed.

I hope this helps a bit more. Ed
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Old 06-26-2013   #12
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Default Re: Shooting the impossible (mirrored cylinder)

I started this thread almost two years ago and have not yet had the chance to shoot one of our capping machines. Again, this is looking to be a possibility and I was going to stock up on large foam core sheets. I'm assuming that for 4x8 sheets, 1/2" thick would be a lot easier to handle than the normal 3/16 sheets. For those of you who have wrangled 4x8 foam core, what do you think? The location has changed, so what I described in the OP isn't accurate. The space is fairly small considering the project at hand, so I'm thinking I might pano the machine in three portrait shots which would allow me to shoot with sections of the mirrored cylinder looking good - merge the good bits together in photoshop.
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Old 06-26-2013   #13
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Default Re: Shooting the impossible (mirrored cylinder)

1/2" foam-core is much more stable and rigid. 3/16" will warp and curve.

If you try to do a vertical pano as you tilt the camera up and down from a fixed position in the center of the height of the machine you will get a convergence of vertical lines. If instead you move the camera itself up and down you'll have differing points of view.

Use one leveled camera position in the center of the height of the machine and use multiple captures with the reflector panels in different locations if needed.. Personally I'd shoot it in one shot using diffusion panels and reflectors as large, or larger if possible, as the machine.
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Old 06-26-2013   #14
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Default Re: Shooting the impossible (mirrored cylinder)

White coroplast may be cheaper than foamcore, (it is around these parts anyway) and it's translucent so lights could be set up outside the coroplast tent & act as a softbox. I haven't done studio lighting so I don't know if that is practical. I have backlit white coroplast many times & it does provide a nice even diffused light.
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Old 06-26-2013   #15
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Default Re: Shooting the impossible (mirrored cylinder)

I once had a job where I had to shoot a lobby with 15 sets of convex brushed stainless steel elevator doors. I went to the nearby charity shop and purchased 20 white bed sheets and suspended them from crossbars on light stands and weighted the sheets down with my old collection of weighted film clips.

Something like that may work for you if you need a LIGHT FIELD light source for a big expanse of highly reflective product.

In the image below; the gold and silver coins are in a light field of lighting. The ones that appear black are in a dark field of lighting. Itís a matter of angle of incidence control and careful light positioning. Some dark lines may be acceptable or even needed to define shape.

A the time of that interior assignment, I had cases full of Foam-Cor board that we routinely used for dry mounting of prints but the 4x8 sheets were too short for the job and stacking them became cumbersome. The sheets set me back about 30 bucks as used items and after a good washing and bleaching at the laundry-mat they were pretty white. Perhaps seamless paper in a horizontal orientation may have done the job but again that can become very cumbersome.

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Old 06-27-2013   #16
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Why not shoot the pano with a tilt shift lens. You could do a 3 frame swing center, left, right
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Old 06-27-2013   #17
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Default Re: Shooting the impossible (mirrored cylinder)

Yeah! If the cylinder shaped machine is tall you may consider a "vertical" pano. Sometimes I do that with church interiors where there is a tall steeple-like altar, Very impressive if you have a tilt/shift lens.

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Old 06-27-2013   #18
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Default Re: Shooting the impossible (mirrored cylinder)

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bobby Deal View Post
Why not shoot the pano with a tilt shift lens. You could do a 3 frame swing center, left, right
Was figuring on a swing like that, but not with a tilt-shift lens. Roberts has a PC 85mm f2.8 D in the rental list, but that's going to be too long for the space I have to work in - especially on a DX body. Photoshop will have to be my tilt-shift tool.

Rental on that lens is only $25/day ... I should take that for a walk sometime to get a taste of tilt-shift first hand.

There is a 40x60 white muslin on Craigslist here - designed to hang portrait, but that could be addressed. I haven't found sources for super-sized backdrops online (haven't tried real hard) so I don't know how it's priced. Considering the cost of a case of foam-core plus delivery by truck, a large white muslin isn't out of the question. The facility has an overhead crane, so I could make a PVC or EMT frame and lift it high enough to clear the top of the machine. The problem with the 40x60 is that 2/3rds of it would be crumpled on the floor. Some could be pulled in toward the machine to cover the floor, but managing that much excess fabric would be a pain, I'm sure.

It's also worth mentioning that the client (my employer) is willing to buy something like a large muslin or a case of foam core to store on-location as we will surely shoot other equipment there in the future. It just has to be reasonably priced.
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Old 06-27-2013   #19
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Default Re: Shooting the impossible (mirrored cylinder)

Zemlin, muslin or cloth will wrinkle and those wrinkles will show when reflected in a mirror surface. Use a smooth surface such as white foam-core or white seamless paper.
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Old 06-27-2013   #20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pro70z28 View Post
White coroplast may be cheaper than foamcore, (it is around these parts anyway) and it's translucent so lights could be set up outside the coroplast tent & act as a softbox. I haven't done studio lighting so I don't know if that is practical. I have backlit white coroplast many times & it does provide a nice even diffused light.
Uline has 4x8 Coroplast as well. Hadn't considered that as an option. It's about $10/sheet less expensive. Would be a LOT more cleanable too. Will consider that. Being able to light it from the outside could be beneficial.


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