A camera for the backwoods
PhotoCamel: Your friendly photo community, with free discussion forums, digital photography reviews, photo sharing, galleries, downloads, blogs, photography contests, and prizes.
 

Go Back   PhotoCamel - Your Friendly Photography Forum > Cameras and Lenses > Camera Equipment Reviews

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 03-18-2018   #1
Vicuna
 
JanetP's Avatar
 
Location: Marion, NC
Posts: 81
CamelKarma: 28004
Editing OK?: Ask First
Constructive Critique?: Yes
Default A camera for the backwoods

Hey, folks. 'Tis the season to hit the trails and I am in search of a smaller camera for backpacking. My everyday walk-around camera is a Nikon D-5200 with an 18-55 lens but even that is too bulky and clunky to schlep into the backwoods. I am not a fan of carrying a lot of gear when most of the trail is uphill and far from civilization. I am also not a fan of camera bags that are backpacks. And don't get me started on using the camera on my cellphone. I despise the thought. Extra batteries don't weigh that much.

I have been reading reviews of different cameras online but would like to hear from those of you who use them and what the trade-offs are in terms of image quality, etc.

Many thanks.

__________________
Members don't see ads in threads. Register for your free account today and become a member of PhotoCamel to open up the site's many benefits and features.
JanetP is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-19-2018   #2
F1 Camel
 
Narsuitus's Avatar
 
Posts: 2,773
CamelKarma: 31066
Editing OK?: Ask First
Constructive Critique?: Yes
Default Re: A camera for the backwoods

Quote:
Originally Posted by JanetP View Post
... I am in search of a smaller camera for backpacking. My everyday walk-around camera is a Nikon D-5200 with an 18-55 lens but even that is too bulky and clunky to schlep into the backwoods.
Here are my options:

Option 1 (my smallest setup)
Canon G15 compact digital
Supplemental close-up lens set

Option 2
Nikon APS-C digital SLR body
18mm f/3.5 Nikon
55mm f/3.5 Nikon macro
Tamron 28-200mm f/3.5 f/5.6

Option 3
Nikon APS-C digital SLR body
18mm f/3.5 Nikon
28mm f/2.8 Nikon
55mm f/3.5 Nikon macro

Option 4
Nikon APS-C digital SLR body
18-55mm f/3.5 to f/5.6 Nikon
105mm f/2.8 Nikon macro
Nikon extension tube

Here is the extra stuff I may take:
Tabletop tripod
Monopod which also serves as a walking stick
Extra memory cards
Extra batteries
Plastic garbage bag to protect equipment from rain
Narsuitus is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-19-2018   #3
PhotoCamel Supporter DONATED
Photocamel Master
 
verdesardog's Avatar
 
Location: Arizona
Posts: 7,264
CamelKarma: 3243224
Editing OK?: Yes
Constructive Critique?: Yes
Default Re: A camera for the backwoods

The best camera is the one that you have with you. There is nothing wrong with a cell phone camera these days. I always have it with me.


1.jpg
__________________
Michael

COMMENTS, CRITIQUES ALWAYS WELCOME

IMAGINE ALL THE PEOPLE LIVING LIFE IN PEACE
verdesardog is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 03-19-2018   #4
Photocamel Master
 
scoundrel1728's Avatar
 
Location: Oakland, CA, USA
Posts: 9,661
CamelKarma: 1461679
Editing OK?: Ask First
Constructive Critique?: Yes
Default Re: A camera for the backwoods

Assuming that dawn or dusk shots and other low-light shots are of low priority, and you won't be making a lot of big enlargements, you probably don't actually need a camera with an APS-C sized imager or the comparatively large size that goes with one. I would therefore advise going with a "bridge" camera with a reasonably big imager, such as the Canon G15 kit that Narsuitus recommended. Cameras with smaller imagers also tend to have close-up capability built in. These frame more tightly than dSLRs and, more often than not, can work better and frame tightly enough without closeup lenses. Your typical single-element closeup lenses tend to mess up the sharpness and contrast of the image anyway, unless you stop down to f/8 or so.

Cameras having super telephoto capabiliy tend not to frame particularly tightly. However, super telephoto capability may be useful if you plan to take pictures of wildlife such as timid forest creatures and birds. If you need telephoto capability only occasionally, you might look into a separate teleconverter to go in front of the lens. Of course, your camera model needs filter threads or a separate adapter tube for this to be a viable option. You may also want filter threads anyway for mounting a polarizing filter for bringing out clouds or for shooting stream beds and the like without undue interference from surface glare. Some people also use attenuators for long exposures to smooth out the surface of water or smearing out clouds. Plan on taking a tripod with you if you try these long-exposure shots though.

And if you want more capability than is in a single model of bridge camera, you can take two different models. After all, they're smaller than dSLRs plus lenses and accessories and cheaper too, especially if you buy them used. And burn this into your gray matter: no one camera model is best at everything; tt really depends on what YOU want to do and the tradeoffs you are willing to make to get most of what you really want.
scoundrel1728 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-21-2018   #5
F1 Camel
 
Golem's Avatar
 
Posts: 2,735
CamelKarma: 579288
Editing OK?: Yes
Constructive Critique?: Yes
Default Re: A camera for the backwoods

`


M43 weatherproof models.

Not all lenses are weatherproof
but one I'm using happens to be
so, a 12-60 zoom [FF=24-120],
with OIS. Focuses crazy close.

I don't happen to know about
any other weatherproof lenses,
but mine can't be the only one.
Golem is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 03-21-2018   #6
Llama
 
Posts: 857
CamelKarma: 6046996
Editing OK?: Yes
Constructive Critique?: Yes
Default Re: A camera for the backwoods

My cousin, who's a better photographer than I. has switched from a Nikon D300 to a smaller Olympus mirrorless. (don't know model).

https://www.flickr.com/photos/marylesh/

She showed it to me, and I was impressed.
Mike67 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-24-2018   #7
F1 Camel
 
Golem's Avatar
 
Posts: 2,735
CamelKarma: 579288
Editing OK?: Yes
Constructive Critique?: Yes
Default Re: A camera for the backwoods

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike67 View Post
My cousin, who's a better photographer
than I. has switched from a Nikon D300
to a smaller Olympus mirrorless. (don't
know model).

https://www.flickr.com/photos/marylesh/

She showed it to me, and I was
impressed.
The Olympus sensor is not tiny, and
the D300 sensor is not large. Altho
there is some difference, it is LESS
than the difference between APS-C
and FF. The Olympus's sensor is 3/4
the size of the D300's sensor, and is
much newer technology. So, there's
no real sooprize that its moderately
smaller format is no impediment to
superior image quality, as compared
to an excellent, but older, camera.


__________________
Members don't see ads in threads. Register for your free account today and become a member of PhotoCamel to open up the site's many benefits and features.
Golem is online now   Reply With Quote
Reply

« PhotoCamel - Your Friendly Photography Forum > Cameras and Lenses > Camera Equipment Reviews »


Share this topic:


Tags
backpacking, hiking, light weight cameras
Thread Tools
Display Modes