Baby Poser Prop - Page 2
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Old 11-09-2008   #11
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Location: South Carolina
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Default Re: Baby Poser Prop

Thanks Ed,

I appreciate your offer to research this thing. I'm quite handy in the workshop and the design of this thing is very straight forward. It really only has the one moving part and now that I've found the specialty bit of hardware that makes it work I'm relieved.

A couple of things about this device. The stationary part and the moving part are both covered with about 2 inch thick foam rubber. Its cut away in the middle in such away that the baby is nestled into it slightly. By design it is much taller than the baby possed in it. So many other posing devices more resemble either a baby carrier or car seat or they are like the cushion my granmother had on her bed for reclining and watching TV. I've seen many babies posed on these where the view extends beyond the poser. To me these become appliances rather than furnishings.

The poser I'm looking for or may have to build works for infants who aren't yet holding up the head and puts them in that familar reclining position. Its very simple to add a blanket as a cut cloth and makes a nice base for the image. Its invaluable for prop-up poses because it locks at progressive angles.

For safety, when its used on the floor leaned against a stationary posing table mom can be accomodated on a posing stool right beside the baby. That is great because it anchors mom in a place that gives the photographer strategic control of her. The table becomes a handy spot for all the baby plunder so its not a trippin hazard. With a remote shuter release the photographer can move in very close to engage the baby and work the expression. On the table top mom is used as a physical support and her contribution is also out of camera view. Again, she's got her hand on the baby and feeling useful isn't so apt to wander in front of the camera to "see" or to become an obsticle to work around.

I agree with your position on not posing infants, babies, and children in poses that are age and development inappropriate. Photographers should really keep in mind the gneral ability milestones and the photographic ages. Anyone desiring a breakdown on the develpmental ages and the apprpopriate posing is free to ask. It is important that no matter the age of your subjet he must be comfortable and able to maintain the pose longer than it takes to compose, frame and shoot. Having to make multiple trips back to the subject to correct posing wastes precious time (this is paramount with shot attention span subjects) and energy.

Aw, common... don't you think a baby with a ball, bat and cap is just the cutest? Or a one-year old in white coveralls with a paint brush and "spilled pain" cans isn't just darling? I'll hush now.

Steve


Quote:
Originally Posted by Ed Shapiro View Post
I have seen that poser before but for the life of me, I don't remember who the supplier is- I'll look in my old files and see if I can come up with something.

There are also many more gentle baby posers on the market that don't actually look like a torture implements. Check out: the Denny Manufacturing Company, Wicker by Design and Adorama. Many are fuzzy and well padad although sturdy.

If anyone cares to- go to my tutorial about photographing kids. I have a much more organic methods of photographing infants and young babies- I stretch the poor mom out on a mattress on the floor and have her bounce the kid on her tummy- no danger, lots of smiles and good expressions, no safety issues and great head shots! I jut pray that mom has strong abs.

I do, however, have a few baby posers on hand for different cases. I look at it this way; If I am a portrait specialis and/or a specialist in the photography of children, I need to have specialized props and shooting aids on hand that can be employed quickly, especially with little kids. All of this stuff has to be comfortable and safe and of course common sense dictates that children are never left unattained anywhere in the studio or while posing on a table or any posing device. We are using high voltage lighting gear, there are cables around the place and other perils. Parents and my assistant are alway right next to the child all all times during a studio visit. All the outlets are child-protected and all doors leading to work areas are locked.

I don't think any of theses specialized posing devices are a waste of money or space. I would rather invest in items that are designed for my everyday work than exotic lenses or other accessories that I would seldom or ever use.

On the "con" side of baby posers. I would not use a device that makes a 2 moth old baby seem to be sitting up like a 7 month old kid- that looks very unnatural. I don't like gimmicky poses with infants wearing baseball caps and sports attire. Most young babies look natural in a reclining position or in the arms of their mother. I will encourage parents to bring in their own props such as an old cradle that has been in the family for years and things of sentimental value relating to newborns.

Ed

Please excuse poor quality images- computer is defective and can no longer be properly calibrated- will be replaced soon.


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