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Old 06-22-2014   #11
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Default Re: Advice on ND filters

I get my filters (B+W, Schneider, and Lee) from 2filter.com. Why not give them a call and run what you're looking to do by them. They've always given me good advice.

Camera Filters, 2filter.com in Sales Tax Free NH

Just my $.02
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Old 06-22-2014   #12
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So would you not suggest using a CPL and a ND filter?
nope,, with the big stopper you have an adapter ring that screws onto the end of your lens, this enables the filter holder to slide over the adapter ring, you'd have to screw the adapter ring onto your polarizer, the combination of all the above would be to much for your 17-40,, you can adjust in PP to compebsate for cloud definition/saturation and so forth,, I have a Singh Ray Polarizer, expensive polarizer, but never use it in combination with the ND filter
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Old 06-22-2014   #13
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Default Re: Advice on ND filters

I use a screw on CPL in conjunction with plate filters. It can be a bit tedious, but it works fine.
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Old 06-22-2014   #14
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M......................
I have never had experience with the variable ones but I suspect that the work on the principle of cross-polarization. If that is the case; there may be more that two optical surfaces in their design. I have not heard any in depth reviews on theses filters but I also suspect that theses may be too thick for use with wide angle lenses. I am going to do my research on theses items. Another question that interests me is if the variable ND filters work on cross polarization principles, I would wonder if this would have any effect on the highlights or reflections in any given scene, portrait or product shot. Sometime eliminating reflections is a good thing and sometimes it is not a desirable effect where strong or specular highlights are desirable. I also wonder if this kind of filter has the properties of a circular polarizer which are needed for full functions of all DSLR automated exposure and focus features.

I hope this helps! Ed
Ed, I use the Singh Ray Vari-N-Trio and no, you can't use it with UWA lenses. As a matter of fact, with a "full frame" 35mm camera you're limited to about 34mm before you start seeing the edge of the filter. The variable ND filters are indeed two polarizers together. I know with my particular unit (the Vari-N-Trio) you can set your polarization first and then set your density. Don't ask me how that works but it does work. One thing I've noticed however is that the polarizers effect isn't quite as strong as my B&W CPL.
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Old 06-23-2014   #15
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Default Re: Advice on ND filters

I also have a Vari ND, Ive noticed when you set the ND to its most extreme setting you'll get some weird colorizations too, it's also stated on the Singh Ray site that you'll experience strange colorizations if set to the max level, so personally I never use the vari nd filter anymore, you can always use it set up to like 6 stops and its fine though but I tend to like more extreme when I shoot water and clouds
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Old 06-23-2014   #16
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Neutral density filters have become more popular nowadays than in the past. Working at maximum apertures was always a tried and true technique for enabling selective focus, good “bokeh” and soft background effects. Using off camera electronic flash in outdoor environments is another emerging and popular technique that may require good neutral density filters and their accompanying techniques. In the film era it was easy enough to find slower speed emulsions to accommodate larger f/stops and many cameras had full synch (between the lens) shutters to enable fill flash shutter speed at 1/500sec. or faster. In black and white work I routinely used colored filters even in portraiture; the green filter to darken skin tones and the orange ones to impart a more porcelain-like effect. Theses filters all have built in neutral density- so…wide apertures were easy to achieve- add a polarizer or a simple ND filter and you could probably get to f/1.5 or something like that.

In out present world of digital cameras, most bodies won’t go much lower that ISO 200 and sometimes lowering the sensitivity is a tedious affair. Much of the latest engineering goes to low light work in difficult available light situations where the photographers want depth of field (via smaller apertures) and fast shutter speeds as well. At ISO 3200+ in a low noise full frame body; that’s somewhat more easily achievable than cranking things way down.

The consensus here seems to be that the gold standard in ND filters are high quality filters of individual densities and where wide angle lenses are in use, perhaps, larger than necessary diameters are advisable. Vignetting problems will set in when deeper adapter rings or step-up rings are in use or if the filter is intrinsically very thick. Variable neural density filters using cross-polarization can introduce color shifts or possibly some kind of chromatic aberrations likely causing (this is a guess) color fringing, moiré patterns or other such gremlins.

Scatterbrained! Thanks for that vegnetting illustration and your information on that Sing-Ray filter- right on! If anyone has this problem and are presently stuck with one filter; a quick fix would be to shoot looser to avoid the edges where the vegnetting occurs. This, of course, will somewhat affect sharpness where high degrees of enlargement or cropping are required- it’s just a stop gap measure in a hitch. Serious vegnetting will probably NOT be problematic with normal or telephoto lenses and longer focal length settings on zoom lenses. Cheap filters are a no-no!

Ed
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Old 06-23-2014   #17
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Default Re: Advice on ND filters

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I use a screw on CPL in conjunction with plate filters. It can be a bit tedious, but it works fine.

Thanks that helps.
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Old 06-24-2014   #18
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Default Re: Advice on ND filters

There doesn't seem to be any suggestions against Lee or for another product so I am assuming everyone is for using the Lee system?
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Old 06-24-2014   #19
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Default Re: Advice on ND filters

I use Singh Ray personally, but they are even more expensive than Lee. Lee makes quality filters as well; you can't go wrong with either one.

Singh Ray are great to deal with, and they're based in Florida.


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