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Old 02-09-2010   #1
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Default How to Photograph Babies and Young Children

ON THE PHOTOGRAPHY OF BABIES AND YOUNG CHILDREN.

By Ed Shapiro

In the good old days of portraiture, the photography of babies and children constituted a goodly portion of the portrait studio’s income. Really great studies of children were the domain of the experienced professional portraitist. This public conception of the professional portrait photographer was further enhanced by the success of pros like Constance Banister (of The Banister Babies fame) and Joseph Schneider, who’s photographs appeared on just about every baby product ever made and graced Kodak’s advertising layouts for decades. Consumers would drag their little darlings off to the neighborhood photographer to have real nice baby pictures- ya know- the ones with the white backgrounds and the big smiles. The average mom and dad would sooner spend money on professional photographs of their children, than for portraits of themselves. Fast forward to today’s marketplace and you find talented pros trying to compete with Wal-Mart style, run of the mill baby pictures, to no avail. The bargain basement operators are now getting the lion’s share of the kid’s market and oftentimes even in the cases of otherwise high-end buyers. Sure we have all the fancy gear, beautiful backgrounds and props. We do better composition and lighting nicer finishes- so what happened? Well, if there is one thing the hacks have learned is how to get good expressions out of the kids. Stick a cute child in the middle of the picture, add a few licensed cartoon characters or some other obnoxious mish-mash, in the background, a big grin and bingo-and they have the formula for high volume sales. It’s the expression that sells! Most folks, not being aficionados of fine portraiture, are happy enough with the results to spend their money on less than great photography. And if (you digital folks) think you are immune to this- watch out- the angel wings and instant digital images are coming to a Wal-Mart near you- soon!

So what do you do to reclaim you share of the kid’s market? This entails a lot of hard work including client education, public exhibitions, networking and most importantly, sharpening up your skills as a photographer of children. You’ll need to have the product before your marketing program can be launched. By the way, If you have any phobias relating to screaming babies, nursing mothers, diaper odors, projectile vomiting (yourself being the target), spoiled kids and hyperactive parents, this might not be your forte. If you can handle it, then read on brave shooter and keep an extra clean shirt in your studio or camera case.

An experienced photographer of children can easily write a tome about the trials, tribulations, techniques, pleasures and rewards of photographing kids. This article will deal with methods of achieving good expressions and some cooperation when making the actual portrait sittings. In order to be able to motivate or cajole children to behave or perform during the course of a portrait session, you should possess some basic and practical understanding of child development and psychology. I am not talking about these phenomena in a clinical sense, but strictly as a means of relating to babies and children in your daily photographic work. These concepts will be your tools or tricks of your trade, so to speak. Knowing what to expect from various age groups is a huge advantage.

My basic concepts are:

LITTLE PEOPLE: Children are small (sometimes funny looking) people and should be treated as such. Don’t do anything to scare them, make them feel physically or emotionally uncomfortable and approach them with warmth and gentleness at all times.

PLAYING: For children, playing is their attempt at living, so you have to get down on the floor and be willing to play. There is no time to be reserved or self-conscious. This is a great time to make a fool of yourself and get paid for it all at the same time. All of the antics that I was admonished for, back in junior high school; making animal sounds, doing funny faces, wearing crazy hats, intentionally crossing my eyes, tickling other kids, and most importantly, generating rude noises, have all become profitable and essential job skills.

FORBIDDEN PLEASURES: Ever since Adam and Eve, adults have been into forbidden pleasures. With little kids, these are a lot more simple and innocent. You don’t even need apples or snakes and your chances of being turned into a pillar of salt are virtually nil. For kids, forbidden pleasures are playing with the toilet paper, eating too many sweet treats and/or hitting siblings and other kids or, heaven forbid, adults and parents. I hate to tell you this, but most children at certain ages, enjoy a bit of gentle violence. This is not the fault of the parents, a genetic defect, the result of watching too much TV, or a serious syndrome in the offing. It’s just the way they come from the factory and it goes away.

These are the big three: Treat babies and children with care, Play with them and use some of those forbidden pleasures to cajole them into a cooperative state of mind. All you have to do now is learn to channel your new insights into practical methodologies and devise the appropriate approach for each age group.

To prepare your studio for these new adventures, you will need to make a sizable investment in some highly sophisticated new gear, some of which is mentioned here: Several rolls of toilet paper or a box of facial tissue, Scotch tape, some gentle noise makers- duck calls are good, some teddy bears and rag dolls, Sponge Bob and a Kermit the Frog or Cookie Monster are handy. As for stuffed animals- keep them clean, classical, and photogenic and in key in case they show up in your composition. Gum drops, raisins, and other non-messy goodies should always be supplied by the parents.

AGE 4-8 WEEKS: At this early stage of development babies are almost completely internally driven. There are few things that we can do to influence the baby’s expression. Their eyes can only focus on nearby persons or objects. They might respond to gentle sounds like mom’s voice. Sometimes a brightly colored fluffy little toy will attract a brief gaze. A little tickle on the cheek with some soft tissue paper might raise a tiny expression or a simulated smile (which is really gas or a BM in progress. Try not to refuse to photograph very young babies- if you do that because they are too young, you might not get your client back for subsequent business. Do your best with newborns and try to photograph them in the arms of the mother or both parents.

2 to 3 MONTHS: Now babies begin to socialize a little more. They start to extend their arms out a reach for toys that you are using to attract their attention. Move and shoot quickly so that you don’t get their arms in front of their little faces. Gentle noises and a little bit of tummy tickling will work. Discourage doting parents from wildly jangling keys in the baby’s face or overreacting with loud noises. Have them sing, clap gently and tickle.

4 to 6 MONTHS: At four months, babies will really laugh. They like to put everything in their little mouths including their feet. If blankets or stuffed critters are used as props, you will need to work quickly before these fluffy items are saturated with saliva. Make sure cuddle toys don’t have removable or loose eyes or other parts as baby will swallow them in short order. In the fifth and sixth months their personalities and senses of humor begin to show and they quickly turn into little monkeys, What I like to call the “monkey stage” is where the fun begins. Funny noises are always a big hit. Balancing things on your head might conjure up a quizzical expression. Blowing small sheet of tissue into the air also works well for me. Some little boys like a bit more aggressive tummy tickling or some very gentle "rough play" from mom or dad. I ask the parent to make contact with the baby and withdraw quickly and I shoot in between tickles. This also helps to direct the baby’s eyes to a pleasing position. Toward the end of this developmental stage, babies will usually sit up and maintain posture with little or no support.

7 to 9 MONTHS: The "monkey stage" continues. At this point babies become more agile. They roll over, start to crawl and become a lot more mobile. They also tend to concentrate on small objects and will play for short periods of time. At this point the SAFTY FIRST rule must prevail. I work on the floor because babies can not fall up- they fall down. All my lighting equipment and camera support gear goes right down to the floor. Lots of entertainment is needed to prevent baby from taking off by crawling off the set or rolling over just before you get the best expression. At this stage of development I make more noise, bounce balls up in the air and make more physical contact with the baby. I always approach gently and if he/she reacts badly, I quickly retreat and start another activity like "peek-a- boos”. I will alternate with parents as entertainer. I quickly adapt to the child’s rhythm and continue to play and shoot. At this age I also find babies to be generally happier with themselves. The start to get their land legs and may try to stand with some support.

10 to 14 MONTHS: Rapid crawling becomes the order of the day. Clinging to the furniture and standing will also happen. More entertainment is needed to hold their attention. You will get more smiles and interesting expressions because baby’s social skills are improving. By 14 months, their sense of humor surfaces to the point where all your shenanigans will be very effective. Flying toilet paper, funny noises, and gentle clapping will be well received. The child’s attention span will slightly lengthen but can turn to crankiness within seconds. This is where some forbidden treats are handy. Ask the parents to bring along some non-messy treats- cold cereal bits are good. After baby has swallowed and is ready to ask for more, get ready to shoot quickly. Keep a clean damp cloth hand to gently remove crumbs and other residue from baby’s face. If the child is in a bad humor try this- I call it "make mommy into a mattress". I have a thin mattress, which I place, on the floor. I ask mommy to lie down on the mattress and place baby on her tummy. I move in for a tight close-up and have mother "bounce the baby". This will usually get the smiles back and helps strengthen mom’s abs. This method alleviates the baby’s fear of separation form mommy and is loads of fun for all. This method will also work in combination with forbidden treats and flying toilet paper and/or funny noises. Do not use the mattress technique if baby has had a swig of milk or you may receive a nasty surprise when baby chucks his lunch- all over YOU!

15 to 20 MONTHS: GANGBUSTERS- At this stage of their childhood, kids can do the 100 yard dash right out of your camera room. To say they are very active is an understatement. They are discovering and enjoying all their newfound physical skills with a passion. They are into everything. Keep electrical cables out of reach- baby might try to bite into one of them. All sharp items, tools and fragile stuff must be banished from the camera room. A kid can swing into action within nanoseconds, so watch out! Game playing is a good way to curtail some of this action. I find 2 year old like to play with shinny coins. I place a quarter in the floor and tell the child to stand ion it so I can’t take it away. If they wander, I reach for the coin and he/she will quickly jump back into place with a big smile. After I get my shots, I reward my subject with the quarter. Costs me 2 bits but I get some very salable full length shots. My favorite- Ask the child if he wants to see a bird fly. Place a sheet of toilet paper on your mouth with your nose pointed at the ceiling. When you assistant is ready to shoot blow the tissue into the air along with a rude noise. You will bring the house down. This also works with grumpy adults and children of all ages.2 to 3 YEARS: You have heard of the terrible 2s- I don’t know- I think the 3s can be worse. In fact I have a 39 year old daughter (love her) who is still a pain in the backside anyway! The 2s can get in and out of chairs, like to here music and singsong stuff and even be able to pose with a flower or a prop for a few seconds. The attention span is growing and you may not have too much trouble achieving good poses and expressions. At this stage some of that "baby violence" begins to rear it’s mischievous little head. If your subject is sad or lackluster try this. Seat your subject on a comfortable bench with his feet firmly planted on the floor. Ask him to give you a "high five" or a tap or whack on your hand. He might be a bit reluctant at first, but with a little coaxing he will eventually strike. As soon as he makes contact you must over-react in a comical fashion. Fall to the floor in "excruciating pain" distort your hand and sob- “It’s broke!”! “I have to go to the doctor”! By this time the kid is usually consumed by laughter. Shoot-shoot-shoot, complaining all the way- "Quick- get me a Band-Aid” This can prolong your subject’s attention beyond belief. In certain cases it will be necessary wait a few seconds before shooting to allow a manic devilish expression to settle into a grin of great accomplishment. Hitting and adult and getting away with it -wow- a very forbidden pleasure. Also try the toilet paper trick. You will have a friend for life.

THREE to FOUR (or early 5th) YEARS: This is the most fun for me! These kids love to play and joke. Silly words and concepts are an art form to this group. “Hi, My name is Monkey Face, what’s yours”? is always a good conversation starter. “Oh! I like your white dress- are you here for a wedding picture”? This is dynamite stuff, especially if she is wearing a green dress. I refrain from funny faces, as they will tend to imitate these faces rather then laugh at them. If that does happen I react with fright- the smiles resume. If all else fails just say "ishkabibble". or "bliberschnazel". and see what happens. With the right kind of encouragement, these kids can get in to some great dramatic poses and expressions. I might get a child to fold his or her arms on my posing table and place her chin on her wrist. I whisper "let’s surprise mom, dad or grandma with a secret pose- they will think your all grown up”! Kids love to conspire in such plans. I can usually capture dozens of beautiful gentle expressions while involved in such conspiracies. Engaging kids of this age group in actual (photogenic) activities, such as coloring or reading story books can result is many natural and unique “poses”. This ploy works even better with the 5 and 6 year group. See what happens with the TP trick at this age.

FIVE to SIX YEARS: This is pure pleasure! These kids want social acceptance and want to please. We can engage in real or funny conversations. You will receive actual feedback. You can get into some more sophisticated poses and will usually get lots of cooperation. This age group is where my display and competition prints come from. If you are patient and giving, these children will reward you with wonderful images- the rest is up to you.

SEVEN & UP- Just talk with them, not at them. Motivate them as you would an adult, with slight modifications. Too much silliness will put them off. You better bone up on sports, sci-fi, and pre- teen topics. You will be surprised as to what the kids know. I once jokingly asked an 8-year-old boy if he had a little girl friend at school. He did not grind his toe into the carpet and look away shyly, instead, he told me he had 5 girlfriends and proceeded to name and describe all of them in short order. He even referred to one of them as "that cute little blond who sits across from him in the lunchroom". Consider yourself warned! Remember kids are simply smaller people on the road to adulthood. Watching and recording them getting there, is part of a portrait photographer’s life.

APPLYING YOUR METHODS: As I wrote at the beginning of this article. Babies and kids are simply little people. Just like adults, not everyone reacts exactly the same way to any given stimulus. Always approach every child gently. If any of the above methods seem to scare the child, switch to something else immediately. Lowering your voice and moving more slowly will help. All children need time to acclimate to new surroundings and people. Don’t use all your methods up too early in the game. When the child arrives at my studio, I simply greet them with a smile or a wave and give them time to check things out. And here is the most important principle of all: If it ain’t broke, don’t fix it. Some babies and children are jolly individuals who will smile at just about anything. If that is the case just shoot. Some of the tactics I have discussed are meant to distract, attract and cajole reluctant, frightened or crying babies and children. If the kid you are photographing is a ham- just go for it. Always ask the parents about nap and feeding times for their baby. There is no sense in bringing a tired or hungry child in for a sitting. Hard crying feeds on itself and there is no way to remedy the problem except for re-scheduling the session at a better time.

PARENT MANAGEMENT: You will need the parent’s total cooperation to make effective and beautiful studies of babies and children. During the course of a sitting the parents can be your best ally or (unintentionally) the bane of your existence. If not properly briefed, even the most well meaning parent can blow an entire sitting. With younger kids, the parent must be there to prevent fear of abandonment, a leading cause of fear in young children. I tell the parents that I am counting on their help in achieving good expressions. I mention a list of parental no-nos that are counterproductive. The big ones are over preparing the child by saying things like "don’t forget to smile for the photographer", "behave yourself" etc, etc. If this happens you will end up with a kid with a fake (jaccolantern) smile pasted on his face. If the parent becomes nervous before the session, this reminds the child of similar parental reactions before going to the doctor or the dentist- Not good! I advise them to explain to the child that they are going to have a lot of fun, play with some toys and take some pictures. The less fussing the better. When they arrive at the studio, I immediately assign "jobs" to the parents and enquire as to who has the fastest reflexes and who the best entertainer is. The one with the fast reflexes gets to be the safety person while the entertainer helps me with the expressions. The other ground rules include such items as not admonishing the kid for not cooperating or becoming exasperated during the sitting. By the time I am finished with parents, they are too tired to interfere with me. They always say that they can’t believe I do this every day and pay my sitting fee with pleasure and appreciation. Just add some of these techniques to you already artful photography and you will reap the rewards and give those Wall-Mart type guys a run for their money. You’ll be the expert who really knows kids- and don’t forget to charge a fee that is commensurate with your skills.

TECH NOTES: I work with a Hasselblad ELX with the 80mm, 100mm 120mm 150mm and 250mm lenses. I prefer Portra 160 NC for kids. My studio is equipped with Photogenic lights suspended from a rail system. Weather permitting, I like working out of doors with natural light, gobos and reflectors. When working with children, I always work with an assistant. EDIT- Although I still use film for certain sittings my digital equipment is now in use. I have a D300 in use and I have converted my RZ67 to digital.

Personal Note: It today’s harried world of professional photography with all it’s crushing deadlines, demanding brides and rushing executives there are times when I simply enjoy sitting on the floor, camera in hand, and playing with the children. To be able to capture the innocence of childhood, the fleeting expressions and moments that will be never again repeated, in an artful fun filled manner is indeed a wonderful experience.

Ed.

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Last edited by swampler; 10-01-2013 at 07:41 PM.. Reason: Typos and some detail corrections. Oct. 22, 2010
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Old 02-09-2010   #2
A professional viewpoint.
 
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Default Re: How to Photograph Babies and Young Childredn

Sorry- Accidental duplication.
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Old 02-10-2010   #3
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Default Re: How to Photograph Babies and Young Childredn

Ed, that's quite the block of text. Maybe some photos and examples mixed in would make for an easier read.
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Old 02-13-2010   #4
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Default Re: How to Photograph Babies and Young Childredn

Ed,

Thanks for the detailed tutorial. I have to agree with bpphotographycdn about the photos as a helpful tool to illustrate the points provided. I'll be referring back to this tutorial over and over. Thanks again.
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Old 02-13-2010   #5
A professional viewpoint.
 
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Default Re: How to Photograph Babies and Young Children

COMMING SOON TO A COMPUTER NEAR YOU- PHOTOGRAPHS!!

As many of you know, I have been unable to post images and diagrams properly;y for some time now, I have a faulty computer, a bad monitor and a crashed hard drive full of images which I can't transmit and gamma problems. All of this is being replaced as we speak and a new portfolio is in the works, I have old negatives to scan, new images in post production and the computer has arrived but the other equipment will be here in about 10 days. I have about a month's work ahead of me and I spend lots of time between shoots and appointments setting up a new work station.

I hope the text is helpful in the interim. I intend to write more tutorials this year- some of theses are from my old files from the days when was giving seminars.

Hopefully I will be able to post images properly by mid March and definitely by early April. I am creating large files for in-studio display and a mobile portfolio case plus images for the forum. Wish me luck!

Ed
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Old 02-13-2010   #6
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Default Re: How to Photograph Babies and Young Childredn

Thank you Ed. I for one look forward to your continued lessons here, I enjoyed reading and leraning from you elsewhere, but did not participate as I should have to keep that going. I did like the lighting info you presented there. Keep it up.
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Old 02-25-2010   #7
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Default Re: How to Photograph Babies and Young Children

Thanks for such a detailed tutorial, i've bookmarked it
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Old 03-01-2010   #8
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Default Re: How to Photograph Babies and Young Children

Very informative Ed, as always "Well Done" Thanks for the info!
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Old 03-02-2010   #9
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Default Re: How to Photograph Babies and Young Children

Though it is much long post yet it is good as it informs as well in greater detail on how to take shot of small babies that can look more beautiful and attractive.
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Old 03-02-2010   #10
A professional viewpoint.
 
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Location: Ottawa, Ontario Canada
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Default Re: How to Photograph Babies and Young Children

Thais is not a post, it IS an article. Long articles are good- the have lots of information and the are worth reading, especially when we are trying to photograph children over as long time span, that is, age groups.

If you don't like reading from the screen, download the text and read it at your leisure.

Ed


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