Using gel with strobes
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Old 1 Week Ago   #1
Guanaco
 
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Default Using gel with strobes

I'm having a brain fart. If I want to make my background have a warmer temperature but not have the strobe light the subject to look too warm I'd use a green gel or an orange gel? A green gel to counteract the warm temp set in camera for the background right!

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Old 1 Week Ago   #2
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Default Re: Using gel with strobes

If you want to have the same color balance for the foreground and background, the color balances lighting the foreground and background must be the same. To ensure that the foreground have a neutral color balance, the camera must be balanced for the foreground lighting. To make the color balance for the background warmer (more yellow/red) the color balance of the background lighting must be warmer than that for the foreground. This is usually taken care of, after a fashion, for pictures taken indoors with flash. The flash approximates daylight, while the background is usually lit with incandescent, compact fluorescent, or some other light that has relatively more reds and yellows than the flash. Indeed, you might have an excess of color balance difference, resuliting in a yellowish or brownish cast to your background. if you want to lessen this difference, an orange gel will help, the density of the orange determining how much the yellow in the background is lessened. You might also need a green gel in addition to the orange gel to counteract the greenish cast of background fluorescent light. You will also need considerably less orange for "cool white" fluorescent lights commonly found in office lighting than warm white or the compact fluorescent lighting found in residential lighting. Of course, you will want to use manual white balance with a white card to compensate for the gels and balance the camera's white balance to the foreground lit with the gelled flash. And if you have mixed lighting in your background, good luck - you'll need i!
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Old 1 Week Ago   #3
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Default Re: Using gel with strobes

Omg dude are u serious? U really didn't need to waste all that time typing that out. I didn't for any technical mumbo jumbo. I've seen you tube videos on what I'm asking about I just don't remember what gel counters the warm temperature set in camera when using a strobe.
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Old 1 Week Ago   #4
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Default Re: Using gel with strobes

Yes, I'm serious. The previous research you had done was not evident in the way you had asked your question, so made the assumption that you were largely ignorant of the color balances for different kinds of lighting. Furthermore, you did not say what kind of lighting you were using for your background or even whether it was in a home, office, or studio environment. You may therefore blame your own nonspecifity in your question for what you consider my overlong answer.
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Old 1 Week Ago   #5
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Default Re: Using gel with strobes

`


Quote:
Originally Posted by LRussoPhoto View Post
........
I didn't for any technical mumbo jumbo. I've
seen you tube videos on what I'm asking about
I just don't remember what gel counters the
warm temperature set in camera when using a
strobe.

Since you've already set your camera to a tungsten
light WB, you'd use the 85A or B to convert the color
of the flash to approximately match typical tungsten
interior lighting [or tungsten-imitating LEDs or CFLs].

This would hold true even if shooting film, where an
80A or B blue filter goes over the lens instead of the
digital convenience of just "dialing up a blue filter" by
using a "tungsten" manual WB. So it's blue, not green,
that is the neutralizing opposite of an orange filter.

The opposite of green is not orange but magenta or
purple. You may recall the purple-ish filters used in
the film days to neutralize the uglee green cast from
from fluorescent tubes. What we loosely call "orange"
is effectively an amber color [note the amber-to-blue
axis in the fine tuning section of your WB menu].

I cut down an old Cokin square filter [85A type] to fit
inside the "soft light" dome for my flash and it proved
a very good match to the tungsten-mimic LEDs that I
use for my general household lighting. Since I use the
flash only for weak fill-in lighting, the filter is holding
up OK so far. Heavy flash usage at full power might be
a problem, might cook it and crumble it, especially in
the closed environment of the dome. Commercial flash
filters, like the flash lens itself, are polycarbonate.

I used a Kodak gel directly on a flash head for regular
commercial use, at full power and 1/2 power, and it
soon became wrinkled and very brittle.







`
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Old 1 Week Ago   #6
Guanaco
 
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Default Re: Using gel with strobes

Quote:
Originally Posted by Golem View Post
`





Since you've already set your camera to a tungsten
light WB, you'd use the 85A or B to convert the color
of the flash to approximately match typical tungsten
interior lighting [or tungsten-imitating LEDs or CFLs].

This would hold true even if shooting film, where an
80A or B blue filter goes over the lens instead of the
digital convenience of just "dialing up a blue filter" by
using a "tungsten" manual WB. So it's blue, not green,
that is the neutralizing opposite of an orange filter.

The opposite of green is not orange but magenta or
purple. You may recall the purple-ish filters used in
the film days to neutralize the uglee green cast from
from fluorescent tubes. What we loosely call "orange"
is effectively an amber color [note the amber-to-blue
axis in the fine tuning section of your WB menu].

I cut down an old Cokin square filter [85A type] to fit
inside the "soft light" dome for my flash and it proved
a very good match to the tungsten-mimic LEDs that I
use for my general household lighting. Since I use the
flash only for weak fill-in lighting, the filter is holding
up OK so far. Heavy flash usage at full power might be
a problem, might cook it and crumble it, especially in
the closed environment of the dome. Commercial flash
filters, like the flash lens itself, are polycarbonate.

I used a Kodak gel directly on a flash head for regular
commercial use, at full power and 1/2 power, and it
soon became wrinkled and very brittle.







`

Thanks!


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