Camera Filters
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Old 04-09-2015   #1
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Default Camera Filters

I just started really getting into landscaping photography and was looking to purchase a good filter. I'm not sure what type of filter I should get for my type of photography. Can anyone help? I'm looking to make outdoor colors pop.

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Old 04-09-2015   #2
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Default Re: Camera Filters

first of all WELCOME TO THE CAMEL.

For digital photography there is really little use for filters since most adjustments can be made in post processing. The most commonly used filters are polarizers (which, to some extent can influence outdoor colors) and neutral density filters which are used to influence exposure but not color.
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Old 04-09-2015   #3
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Default Re: Camera Filters

Also graduated neutral density filters, to darken the sky. Polarizers don't work well for this when the angle between the sun and the lens axis is small.
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Old 04-10-2015   #4
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Filters are not so useful anymore. Polarizers can be helpful in certain situations, for reflections or skies. Neutral density filters are useful for long exposures. Most others are no longer very useful. Even graduated neutral density filters are not really needed. Just shoot a few more images and underexpose then combine in photoshop. Or you can try the graduated filter itself in Photoshop. Save yourself some money, and have less stuff to carry with you.
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Old 04-10-2015   #5
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Default Re: Camera Filters

Tiffen Color Enhancing filter of didymim heliolite,
best used with manual white balance. Hard to find
but very special. Cost you about 1.5 EV and a lotta
loot, but worth it. Knocks out just a few spectral
lines. It cannot be imitated in post. If you do night
time landscapes, it can often clean up the sky cuz
the spectral lines it impedes are the sodium vapor
lines. Best of all ... you'll definitely be the first kid
on your block.

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Old 04-10-2015   #6
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Default Re: Camera Filters

I would recommend a polarizer, that can add richness to skies and make clouds pop, it can enrich colors also it can reduce glare on water and glass, I use one all the time and rarely ever take it off, I would also recommend that you don't buy a cheap one, save up some money and buy a decent one, there are many more filters that you can add as you become more experienced but lot of the software these days can do a lot oF What filters can do, good luck.
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Old 04-17-2015   #7
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Default Re: Camera Filters

Quote:
Originally Posted by ANGELSPHOTO View Post
I just started really getting into landscaping photography and was looking to purchase a good filter. I'm not sure what type of filter I should get for my type of photography. Can anyone help? I'm looking to make outdoor colors pop.
I only would start with filters when you know the basics about photography. Then you can beter decided what filter you need. Like a ND or GND or CPL filter. For Landscape you do not need immediately filters to make great photos

I personally use Lee 100mm and Seven5 filter kits. Containing ND GND and CPL filters. Using the GND filters the most of the time.
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Old 04-19-2015   #8
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Default Re: Camera Filters

Quote:
Originally Posted by Koban View Post
I only would start with filters when you know the basics about photography. Then you can beter decided what filter you need. Like a ND or GND or CPL filter. For Landscape you do not need immediately filters to make great photos

I personally use Lee 100mm and Seven5 filter kits. Containing ND GND and CPL filters. Using the GND filters the most of the time.
Altho a filter is a pretty simple accessory, not requiring great experience to use,
that is not bad advice. The most tedious to use amongst filters is the graduated
ND [GND] and perhaps it's better to forget that, and learns to bracket layers and
adjust or HDR them in post for a similar control without complications at the
camera. The main use for ND filters is eliminating pedestrians or blurring water.
Blurred water is an overworked cliche usually applied for no good reason so you
can live without that. Pedestrians you can either incorporate in the image or
just wait them out. If there's an endless eternal stream of pedestrians, they are
definitely part of the subject scene, or you're in the wrong place anywho.

Learning to do more in post is like learning the darkroom before getting more
elaborate [film] camera gear. It's a good way to go.

But we KNOW you're gonna buy a filter anyway !

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Old 04-20-2015   #9
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Default Re: Camera Filters

I have a few Circular Polarizers and ND's laying around in different filter sizes that are doing me no good now (too small for my lenses, or Lee's replaced them) if someone cares or needs....
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Old 06-16-2015   #10
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Default Re: Camera Filters

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Originally Posted by nu2scene View Post
Filters are not so useful anymore. Polarizers can be helpful in certain situations, for reflections or skies. Neutral density filters are useful for long exposures. Most others are no longer very useful. Even graduated neutral density filters are not really needed. Just shoot a few more images and underexpose then combine in photoshop. Or you can try the graduated filter itself in Photoshop. Save yourself some money, and have less stuff to carry with you.
I tend to differ: using a grad ND filter is way faster and cheaper, than buying Photoshop and actually spend time to combine several shots. Also, if you have moving objects in your scenery, using the single shot grad ND filter is a better option anyways.

But all in all I agree with all the previous posts here, that most filters are useless today, as most effects can be chieved easily and with better quality in post-processing, but for:
  1. polarizers - which increase colour saturation, by filtering out reflections and stray light. Also a polarizer reduces excessive contrast betwee a bright sky and the landscape, by reducing the sky's brightness.
  2. Neutral Density (ND) filters: which reduce the brightness uniformely over the whole image, which enables longer expsoure times and/or using faster aperture settings, aka a reduced depth of field.
  3. Graduated Neutral Density (grad.ND) - for the resons given above.

Ben


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