Parking Garage in Long Beach
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Old 11-25-2017   #1
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Default Parking Garage in Long Beach


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Old 12-15-2017   #2
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Striking, and kinda retro in contrast. What is the apparent granulation? I like the effect, but how did you do that?
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Old 12-15-2017   #3
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Striking, and kinda retro in contrast. What is the apparent granulation? I like the effect, but how did you do that?
I'm guessing it's a result of a couple of things. First, it's a scan from a 6x4.5 negative taken with an old (1934) Zeiss folder. Second, I've noticed a lot of whitish circular artifacts from time to time. So, with the roll I developed after this one I did a couple of things; first after stand developing I did the rinsing in the Jobo rather than letting water flush it (thinking this might be bubbles). Second, I did the final rise with distilled water.

They tend to show up more with this particular camera. I once thought it might be microbubles in the glass as I've read Zeiss had an issue with that from this plant back in the thirties. But they tend to come and go which led me to think it was an artifact from development.

This one is from the next roll I shot in this little Super Ikonta A; still PanF, but this time stand developed with Rodinal and rinsed with distilled water. I don't see the same thing here so maybe that's it?

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Old 12-16-2017   #4
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I once thought it might be microbubles in the glass as I've read Zeiss had an issue with that from this plant back in the thirties.
My father, who started photographing before WWII, told me that the microbubbles were considered a sign of quality. "Cheap glass doesn't do that."

Zeiss and Leica had high quality standards. If they'd negatively impacted the optical quality, surely they'd never made it into retail products.

I don't know - maybe my dad was hood-winked.
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Old 12-16-2017   #5
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Th show up as spots in the image, spots in or on the lens would have to be focused, so I doubt that bubbles in the glass would do that. The light spots in the first image might be bubbles in the developer or something, but I doubt that too - they are far to numerous unless you mixed your developer from seltzer water.
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Old 12-16-2017   #6
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Th show up as spots in the image, spots in or on the lens would have to be focused, so I doubt that bubbles in the glass would do that. The light spots in the first image might be bubbles in the developer or something, but I doubt that too - they are far to numerous unless you mixed your developer from seltzer water.
My SOP was to put the tank in the tub with water running into the center tube via funnel at high rate. I read somewhere that water straight from the tap is highly aerated and can produce bubbles.

So far, the second image is from the only roll I've developed by pouring water into the tank slowly and let the Jobo roll it for a while, before repeating 7-10 times with the final rise being distilled water with a few drops of photo flo. I'll have to keep an eye out to see if these circles come back, but so far as this first roll goes it looks pretty good.
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Old 12-16-2017   #7
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Could be condensation on the film if you exposed it just after taking it out of the fridge.
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Old 12-18-2017   #8
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My SOP was to put the tank in the tub with water running into the center tube via funnel at high rate. I read somewhere that water straight from the tap is highly aerated and can produce bubbles.

So far, the second image is from the only roll I've developed by pouring water into the tank slowly and let the Jobo roll it for a while, before repeating 7-10 times with the final rise being distilled water with a few drops of photo flo. I'll have to keep an eye out to see if these circles come back, but so far as this first roll goes it looks pretty good.
When I got firmly established with 35 mm film, I bought a Kodacraft tank that, unlike wire reel or plastic groove tanks, could be loaded even if you had three thumbs and no other fingers on each hand. Instead of using normal spools, these tanks used plastic aprons the width of the film. To load the tank, you rolled the film and the apron into a spool and dropped it into the tank, after which you dropped a metal separator plate, then another apron, either loaded with film as the first apron was or just the empty apron. This could leave undeveloped or unfixed spots on the edges of the film where the apron made contact, but these spots weren't really a problem because they were outside the image area. For washing the film, I had acquired an enema bucket that worked beautifully for print washing because it had a built-in drain hole at the bottom to get rid of the heavier fixer-laden water. Because I could do a complete change of water in a minute and a half - I timed it - things got washed pretty thoroughly. Worked pretty well for wallet-sized prints too, but the bucket wasn''t big enough for anything much bigger than that.


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